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Sitting Down with new UFC Champion Cain Velasquez

Cain Velasquez
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Cain Velasquez

On Oct. 23, Cain Velasquez beat Brock Lesnar to become the new UFC heavyweight champion.

We sat down with Velasquez to talk about everything from the business of the UFC to Arizona’s new immigration status law.

Darren: Fighting in the UFC is so hard. You make one mistake and you could lose. It seems like it’s in the UFC’s best interest to have a heavyweight champion that can reign for a long time, is that realistic?

Velasquez: I think it is. Look at Anderson Silva (the middleweight champ who has won 13 straight UFC matches) and (welterweight champ) George St. Pierre. They’ve been pretty consistent. The key is to stay hungry and keep evolving with the sport.

Darren: You’ve fought nine times and haven’t lost. What’s the key to maintaining that focus for the few minutes you’re in the Octagon?

Velasquez: You just have to fight the perfect fight to win. You have to have a gameplan and follow it. You have to develop every time you go out there and keep getting better.

Darren: Some people argue that in order for the UFC to grow they need characters like Brock Lesnar, who people know was formerly in World Wrestling Entertainment. Do you agree with that?

"You just have to fight the perfect fight to win. You have to have a gameplan and follow it. You have to develop every time you go out there and keep getting better." " -UFC Heavyweight Champ, Cain Velasquez

Velasquez: All I can tell you is I’m going to be myself. I’m not the type of person that is going to develop into some character or come up with some phrase I will always say. I’m going to be the best fighter I can be and focus on being me.

Darren: What sponsors do you have?

Velasquez: I wear Dethrone (clothing), I just shot a commercial for Lugs, my shoe sponsor, and I have a deal with Milwaukee Tools. Before the Lesnar fight, I signed a new deal with BSN, a supplement company.

Darren: Your father came to the United States illegally before becoming a U.S. citizen and you grew up in Arizona. Arizona’s law which requires law enforcement to determine a detained person’s immigration status if they suspect they might be illegally in this country has been much publicized and debated. Given your background, what’s your thoughts on the law?

Velasquez: I’m against it. It’s definitely profiling and I feel strongly about that.

Darren: Do you think you’ll use the position you’re in right now to speak out against it?

Velasquez: If someone comes to me and wants me to publicly stand behind it, I’ll definitely consider doing it.

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