×

Murdoch: UK Should Emulate Singapore’s Million Dollar Ministerial Wages

Rupert Murdoch and his son, James, were contrite during questioning by British Members of Parliament (MPs). Murdoch senior called it the "most humble" day of his life and Murdoch junior calling the hacking a matter of "great regret".

News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch looks down as he leaves the One Aldwych Hotel surrounded by his personal security team to speak with reporters after meeting with the family of murdered school girl Milly Dowler on July 15, 2011 in London, England.
Getty Images
News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch looks down as he leaves the One Aldwych Hotel surrounded by his personal security team to speak with reporters after meeting with the family of murdered school girl Milly Dowler on July 15, 2011 in London, England.

But it wasn't all about eating humble pie, both figurative and real (Click here to watch the attempted ‘pie attack’ on Murdoch senior during the testimony).

Responding to a question from Damian Collins, a Conservative MP on the Culture Media and Sport Committee, on where the limits of investigative journalism lie, Rupert Murdoch went on the offensive and took a dig at members of parliament, several of whom were embroiled in an embarrassing scandal last year for padding their expenses.

"When the Daily Telegraph bought a series of stolen documents of all the expenses of MPs, it caused a huge outcry, one which I feel has not been properly addressed," Murdoch said.

Murdoch said that Singapore's model of paying politicians millions of dollars had created a cleaner and more transparent government and one that Britain should emulate.

"I think there is an answer to it, and we ought to look at them as open and clear as a society in the world, which is Singapore — where every minister gets at least a million dollars a year and the prime minister a lot more and there is no temptation and it is as clean a society as you find anywhere."

Murdoch said it was "ridiculous" that parliamentarians were reduced to claiming fake expenses in order to make up for their income.

Murdoch's comment brought about plenty of mumbling from those present, including someone who quipped: "good luck in selling that to anyone here," accompanied by lots of laughter.