Business News John Roberts

  • Supporters of net neutrality protest outside a Federal Building in Los Angeles, California on November 28, 2017. 

    In a setback for industry groups, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a number of challenges to Obama-era "net neutrality" regulations that barred internet service providers from giving certain customers preferential treatment. 

  • WASHINGTON, Nov 5- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused a request by the Trump administration and the telecommunications industry to wipe away a lower court decision that had upheld Obama-era net neutrality rules aimed at ensuring a free and open internet, though the justices' action does not undo the 2017 repeal of the policy. The Supreme Court's brief order...

  • WASHINGTON, Nov 5- The legal fight over a 2016 lower court ruling upholding Obama-era net neutrality regulations aimed at ensuring a free and open internet- rules that have since been repealed by President Donald Trump's administration- came to a formal end on Monday, with the U.S. Supreme Court declining to take up the matter. The Trump administration and...

  • WASHINGTON, Oct 29- U.S. Supreme Court justices signaled on Monday they may issue more pro-business rulings giving companies wide latitude to use arbitration to resolve disputes with employees, customers or other businesses rather than the courts. The nine justices heard arguments in two cases testing the scope of company agreements forcing disputes to be...

  • Woman shopping at  Wal-Mart

    The high court will rule on a number of cases this term over whether workers can bring disputes against their employers in a court of law or if they will have to submit to arbitration behind closed doors. 

  • The case could have broader implications for social media and other media outlets. In particular, a broad ruling from the high court could open the country's largest technology companies up to First Amendment lawsuits.

  • Chief Justice John Roberts (seated C) leads Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (front row, L-R), Justice Anthony Kennedy, Justice Clarence Thomas, Justice Stephen Breyer, Justice Elena Kagan (back row, L-R), Justice Samuel Alito, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch in taking a new family photo including Gorsuch, their most recent addition, at the Supreme Court building in Washington.

    Being a Supreme Court justice is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. But it’s still a job, and a grueling one, at that. Here’s what it’s like being a Supreme Court justice. 

  • *New York, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey sue. The lawsuit by New York, Connecticut, Maryland and New Jersey came seven months after Trump signed the $1.5 trillion overhaul passed by the Republican-led Congress, which cut taxes for wealthy Americans and slashed the corporate tax rate. "The federal government is hell-bent on using New York as a piggy bank to pay...

  • *New York, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey sue. The lawsuit by New York, Connecticut, Maryland and New Jersey came seven months after Trump signed the $1.5 trillion overhaul passed by the Republican-led Congress, which cut taxes for wealthy Americans and slashed the corporate tax rate. "The federal government is hell-bent on using New York as a piggy bank to pay...

  • Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, right, and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska.

    Collins and Murkowski will decide whether to support Trump's choice partly based on where the judge stands on Roe v. Wade. 

  •  A man bearing an upside down American flag watches as protesters gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court as the court issued an immigration ruling June 26, 2018 in Washington, DC.

    The conservative majority has seen a nearly unbroken string of victories, USA Today reports.

  • Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.

    The debate over what constitutes a reasonable expectation of privacy is shifting because today’s technology puts so much personal data in one place. 

  • *Conservative Roberts, all liberal justices join 5-4 ruling. WASHINGTON, June 22- The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a major victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. In the ruling written by...

  • *Conservative Roberts, all liberal justices join 5-4 ruling. WASHINGTON, June 22- The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a major victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. In the ruling written by...

  • WASHINGTON, June 22- The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a major victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. In the 5-4 ruling, the court said police generally need a court-approved warrant to get access to...

  • WASHINGTON, June 22- The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. In the ruling written by conservative Chief Justice John Roberts, the court decided in favor of...

  • WASHINGTON, June 22- The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. In the ruling written by conservative Chief Justice John Roberts, the court decided in favor of...

  • *Court upholds South Dakota law, other states could follow. In a 5-4 ruling reviving a South Dakota law challenged by Wayfair Inc, Overstock.com Inc and Newegg Inc, the justices overturned a 1992 high court precedent that had barred states from requiring businesses with no "physical presence" there, like out-of-state online retailers, to collect sales taxes.

  • Journalists use umbrellas against the sun outside the U.S. Supreme Court on a day where the court handed a victory to Wisconsin Republicans who drew state electoral districts that helped entrench their party in power, but sidestepped a major ruling on whether parties have carte blanche to engage in the practice called partisan gerrymandering in Washington, June 18, 2018.

    Although SCOTUS sidestepped a potentially historic voting rights ruling on Monday, the issue could return as soon as next term, USA Today reports.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.

    President Donald Trump is set to attend the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday for the investiture of new Justice Neil Gorsuch.