Government Agencies Justice Department

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    A French inquiry into a record 4.9 billion euros ($7.17 billion) trading loss at Societe Generale widened to a second broker on Friday as investigators sought to establish whether rogue trader Jerome Kerviel acted alone.

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    The U.S.  is looking into stock sales by a member of French bank Societe Generale's board shortly before the bank announced billions of dollars in losses by a single trader.

  • Microsoft

    The three largest Internet companies have agreed to pay a combined $31.5 million to settle federal civil allegations they took ads for illegal gambling, the U.S. Attorney for eastern Missouri said.

  • The U.S. Justice Department and other authorities have stepped up investigations into several large European banks for violating sanctions against Iran, Libya, Cuba and Sudan, the Financial Times reported in its online edition.

  • Solicitor General Paul Clement

    White House sources confirm that U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement will serve as acting Attorney General once Alberto Gonazles leaves the Justice Department in mid-September. And to judge from initial soundings across Washington, no one will be surprised if Clement eventually becomes President Bush's choice to fill the job for the remainder of his term.

  • Private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts said in a regulatory filing that weak debt market conditions could cut into its investment returns, and confirmed it is the subject of a U.S. Department of Justice probe for anti-trust violations.

  • Paul McNulty, deputy attorney general at the U.S. Department of Justice, joined "Power Lunch" to address controversial issues raised after U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan dismissed charges Monday against 13 former KPMG employees. One of the issues raised during the case was whether companies paid defendants' attorney charges. This policy, McNulty said, was changed in December, and the Justice Department no longer questions who pays the fees.

  • A U.S. jury Friday found Conrad Black guilty of criminal fraud and obstruction of justice in a grim Friday the 13th verdict that could send the former media baron to jail for up to 35 years.

  • The U.S. justice department has launched a corruption probe into Britain's BAE Systems, a potential headache for Gordon Brown just hours before he succeeds Tony Blair as British Prime Minister.

  • The Bush administration rejected a Securities and Exchange Commission recommendation in a key Supreme Court case and did not support shareholders suing Wall Street banks for damages over Enron's collapse.

  • The U.S. Department of Justice on Monday gave the regulatory green light for the two largest U.S. futures exchanges to merge, saying the proposed combination probably would not hurt competition.

  • IntercontinentalExchange, on Thursday took its unsolicited takeover proposal for the Chicago Board of Trade directly to members of the CBOT, urging them to support ICE's bid over that of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb has agreed to pay a $1 million criminal fine for lying to the federal government about a patent deal involving its Plavix blood thinner, the Justice Department said.

  • The effort to require hedge funds to register just doesn't die. After the court struck down the Securities and Exchange Commission's mandate to require registration, Sen. Charles Grassley picked up the torch. But Senator, consider the comments of the US Attorney for the State of Connecticut.

  • When is a $3 billion company really worth $6 billion? When you're Microsoft, looking for some kind of answer to the Google online advertising juggernaut, and still licking your wounds after losing the billion-dollar bidding war for DoubleClick.Which leads us to Microsoft's mega-merger with Aquantive, offering an 85% premium to yesterday's closing price. It's a bold move, a pricey move, a move Microsoft had to make, but not surprising given what's been happening in the online advertising world these past few weeks.

  • Thursday of this week will be an unusual day for the world of tech. Both Apple and Google will each hold their annual shareholders meetings within ten miles and a few hours of each other. Tech's top two names will speak directly to their shareholders, yet the meetings may have decidedly different tones.

  • The Chicago Mercantile Exchange says it has a “definitive merger agreement” with the Chicago Board of Trade, but the IntercontinentalExchange says its proposed deal offers better long-term growth prospects.

  • The big week in Internet earnings reaches a crescendo this afternoon when Google reports earnings. These numbers come at a fascinating time in the company's history.Google has become a kind of financial underdog, compared to other big names in the sector, including Yahoo, which is still licking its wounds, and eBay, which is enjoying its second beat-and-raise quarter in a row. A strange position to be in for a company trading at nearly $500 a share.

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    If you went to bed and woke up this morning thinking the world was quiet and that today was going to be a light day at the office, you may want to call in, instead of relying on your BlackBerry. Research in Motion confirms a massive, system wide blackout affecting all its 8 million subscribers that began around 8 p.m. ET Tuesday, and while service is being restored, it is still sporadic and may take much of the day to get back on line completely.

  • Double Click

    Google's acquisition of DoubleClick wasn't much of a surprise since blogs and news coverage over the past few weeks have indicated that the company was in play and had several suitors, including Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and various others.But the big surprise happened over the weekend when we found out that Microsoft was building a coalition of companies to come out against the deal, and that the anti-trust poster-company was now playing the part of victim. Needless to say, this pot-calling-the-kettle-black legal strategy is raising some eyebrows.