Pepsi's Challenge

I Can't Believe It's Pepsi!: Unexpected Products

Constance Parten

Did You Know They're Pepsi Owned?

Pepsi is a globally recognized product of its namesake parent company, PepsiCo, but the conglomerate is made up of three subsidiaries: Frito-Lay, PepsiCo Beverage, and Quaker Foods.Most folks know Frito-Lay manufactures brand names such as Doritos and Stacy's Pita Chips, and that PepsiCo Beverage bottles and distributes a wide range of beverages, including the Tropicana and Gatorade brands. But there are other well-known brands that aren’t widely associated with the PepsiCo family, such as Crack
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Pepsi is a globally recognized product of its namesake parent company, PepsiCo, but the conglomerate is made up of three subsidiaries: Frito-Lay, PepsiCo Beverage, and Quaker Foods.

Most folks know Frito-Lay manufactures brand names such as Doritos and Stacy's Pita Chips, and that PepsiCo Beverage bottles and distributes a wide range of beverages, including the Tropicana and Gatorade brands. But there are other well-known brands that aren’t widely associated with the PepsiCo family, such as Cracker Jack or Lipton Iced Tea.

Click ahead to see more of the products you might not know are owned by PepsiCo.

By Constance Parten, Senior Producer
Posted 9 November 2011

Pepsi's Challenge

Naked Juice

As part of its continued focus on healthier products, PepsiCo in November 2006 purchased Naked Juice from North Castle Partners. The Greenwich, Conn.-based private-equity firm had holdings including Avalon Organics, Red Door Spas, and other well-known brands. At the time of the purchase, Naked Juice manufactured 25 drinks and had annual sales of more than $150 million.

As part of its continued focus on healthier products, PepsiCo in November 2006 purchased Naked Juice from North Castle Partners. The Greenwich, Conn.-based private-equity firm had holdings including Avalon Organics, Red Door Spas, and other well-known brands.

At the time of the purchase, Naked Juice manufactured 25 drinks and had annual sales of more than $150 million.

Kretschmer Toasted Wheat Germ

In November 1986, Chicago-based Quaker Oats said it agreed to buy International Multifoods Corp.’s Kretschmer Cereals, according to a report in the . Terms were withheld. Kretschmer had long been a market leader for International Multifoods, but by the time of the sale the company had been going through a major restructuring, focusing its efforts on food service distribution and manufacturing.

In November 1986, Chicago-based Quaker Oats said it agreed to buy International Multifoods Corp.’s Kretschmer Cereals, according to a report in the Chicago Tribune. Terms were withheld.

Kretschmer had long been a market leader for International Multifoods, but by the time of the sale the company had been going through a major restructuring, focusing its efforts on food service distribution and manufacturing.

Rice-A-Roni

In 1986, Quaker Oats acquired the Golden Grain Macaroni of San Leandro, Calif., for an undisclosed amount. Analysts pegged the sale price at between $225 million and $250 million. Quaker said at the time that Golden Grain had annual sales of about $250 million. For the year ended June 30, 1985, Quaker Oats had sales of $3.52 billion.

In 1986, Quaker Oats acquired the Golden Grain Macaroni of San Leandro, Calif., for an undisclosed amount. Analysts pegged the sale price at between $225 million and $250 million. Quaker said at the time that Golden Grain had annual sales of about $250 million. For the year ended June 30, 1985, Quaker Oats had sales of $3.52 billion.

SoBe Lifewater

The SoBe line of drinks began as the South Beach Beverage Co., based in Norwalk, Conn. PepsiCo bought the company in October 2000, beating out Coca-Cola in the acquisition. A person familiar with the deal at the time put the price tag at about $370 million.

The SoBe line of drinks began as the South Beach Beverage Co., based in Norwalk, Conn. PepsiCo bought the company in October 2000, beating out Coca-Cola in the acquisition. A person familiar with the deal at the time put the price tag at about $370 million.

Starbucks Iced Coffee

Starbucks Iced Coffee is the result of a joint venture between Pepsi-Cola North America and a subsidiary of Starbucks Coffee. Its products include Starbucks DoubleShot, DoubleShot Light, Mocha Frappuccino, Mocha Lite Frappuccino, Vanilla Frappuccino, Coffee Frappuccino, Caramel Frappuccino, Strawberries and Creme Frappuccino, Starbucks Iced Coffee, and Iced Coffee Light.

Starbucks Iced Coffee is the result of a joint venture between Pepsi-Cola North America and a subsidiary of Starbucks Coffee. Its products include Starbucks DoubleShot, DoubleShot Light, Mocha Frappuccino, Mocha Lite Frappuccino, Vanilla Frappuccino, Coffee Frappuccino, Caramel Frappuccino, Strawberries and Creme Frappuccino, Starbucks Iced Coffee, and Iced Coffee Light.

Grandma's Cookies

Frito-Lay has been selling the Grandma's brand of cookies since 1980, when it acquired the regional brand for $25 million. The company launched the brand nationally in 1983, and soon was selling five varieties, including a homemade-style cookie that was soft on the inside but crispy on the outside. Procter & Gamble sued Frito-Lay along with two other cookie makers in 1984 for infringing on its patent for Duncan Hines crispy-chewy cookies. The parties settled in 1989, and Frito-Lay agreed to pay

Frito-Lay has been selling the Grandma's brand of cookies since 1980, when it acquired the regional brand for $25 million.

The company launched the brand nationally in 1983, and soon was selling five varieties, including a homemade-style cookie that was soft on the inside but crispy on the outside. Procter & Gamble sued Frito-Lay along with two other cookie makers in 1984 for infringing on its patent for Duncan Hines crispy-chewy cookies.

The parties settled in 1989, and Frito-Lay agreed to pay about $19 million. The remainder of the $125 million settlement was shared equally by the two other defendants, Nabisco and Keebler Co.

Pepsi's Challenge

The iconic American company is launching a campaign of reinvention. Can PepsiCo create healthier products and continue to thrive as the largest snack food company in the world?CNBC takes an unprecedented look inside the quest of a global powerhouse and how it is changing the foods we eat.Premieres Thursday, Nov. 10 at 9 p.m. ET, with reairs at 10 p.m., midnight and 1 a.m. ET.

The iconic American company is launching a campaign of reinvention. Can PepsiCo create healthier products and continue to thrive as the largest snack food company in the world?

CNBC takes an unprecedented look inside the quest of a global powerhouse and how it is changing the foods we eat.

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