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Dow seeks longest win streak in 2½ years

IN THE NEWS TODAY

U.S. stock futures were under pressure this morning, after the latest trade figures out of China rekindled concerns about demand there. The Dow extended gains to seven sessions on Monday. An increase today would mark the longest winning streak since March 2013. (CNBC)

Dow component Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) is out with earnings this morning. J&J has approved a $10 billion buyback. Meanwhile, Dow stock JPMorgan (JPM) kicks off bank earnings after the bell. Intel (INTC) and railroad CSX (CSX) are also out this afternoon. (CNBC)

Former Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher told CNBC the Fed should heed the call of central bankers around the world and get on with hiking interest rates.

Oil prices bounced higher this morning, after slumping more than 5 percent Monday. Meanwhile, the International Energy Agency said global crude demand growth is expected to slow next year. (Reuters & CNBC)

Emerging markets aren't just suffering through another market rout, said Goldman Sachs, it's a third wave of the global financial crisis, coinciding with the collapse in commodities. (CNBC)

Anheuser-Busch InBev (BUD) and SABMiller have agreed in principle to a deal, in which AB InBev would buy its rival brewer for a sweetened price tag of just over $104 billion. (CNBC)

PepsiCo (PEP) and Coca-Cola (KO) are both said to be in talks to buy a stake in Greek yogurt maker Chobani. The potential deals could value Chobani as high as $3 billion. (Reuters)

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush today plans to unveil proposals to repeal Obamacare and replace it with a system to provide a tax credit for the purchase of health plans. (Reuters)

The most telling aspect of tonight's Democratic presidential debate featuring Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Martin O'Malley, Lincoln Chafee, and Jim Webb may be how much they agree. Meanwhile, Clinton criticized GOP frontrunner Donald Trump in front of one of his hotels. (NY Times)

If Trump wins the White House, media titan Barry Diller said he's liable to "move out of the country or join the resistance." Trump responded over the weekend via Twitter, calling Diller "sad and pathetic." (CNBC)

Diller, chairman of IAC/InterActive, along with CBS Chief Executive Les Moonves and Discovery CEO David Zaslav join CNBC's "Squawk Box" for one hour, beginning at 8 a.m. ET this morning.

BY THE NUMBERS

There are no government economic reports due out today, but the parade of Fed speak continues with St. Louis Fed President James Bullard addressing the National Association for Business Economics at 8:10 a.m. ET, and Fed Governor Daniel Tarullo speaking with CNBC at 2:10 p.m. ET.

Even as stock market volatility raised concerns about sales growth, U.S. small business confidence rose marginally last month, according to the National Federation of Independent Business, suggesting the economy was expanding at a moderate pace.

In yet another worrisome sign that holiday spending trends will fall short of last year's growth, a new study by Bankrate has found that more than 3 in 5 Americans are limiting their overall spending each month.

STOCKS TO WATCH

Barclays (BCS) is expected to name former JPMorgan Chase investment banker Jes Staley as its new chief executive officer, according to the Financial Times.

Fortress Investment Group (FIG) reportedly plans to shut down its macro hedge fund after large losses and investor withdrawals this year. The fund, which began in 2002, has been run by well-known trader Michael Novogratz, who's expected to leave Fortress.

Ryder System (R) cut its current quarter and full-year earnings guidance, citing lower than expected used vehicle sales among other factors.

FMC (FMC) plans to cut 800 to 850 jobs and cut its full-year profit forecast, with the chemical maker pointing to weakness in its agricultural solutions unit as well as drop in the value of the Brazilian real.

Boeing (BA) said it expects to sell 150 more of its CH-47F Chinook helicopters to European, Middle East, and African countries through 2022.

WATERCOOLER

As part of a redesign set to be unveiled in March, the print edition of Playboy will still feature women in provocative poses. But they will no longer be fully nude. (NY Times)