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Wall Street set to resume decline on familiar themes

IN THE NEWS TODAY

U.S. stock futures were lower this morning, after closing out Friday the worst January on Wall Street since 2009 but the best single day since September. The S&P 500 clawed its way out of a correction, but the Dow and Nasdaq were still in the soup. (CNBC)

Two familiar factors were weighing on market sentiment this morning: China's slowing economy and falling oil prices. Chinese factory activity skidded to a three-year last month, while crude slumped on fading prospects for an international production cut deal. (CNBC & Reuters)

Chinese stocks lost ground on that factory data report, with the Shanghai composite falling nearly 1.8 percent. But Japan's Nikkei surged almost 2 percent, after the Bank of Japan's surprise move on Friday to adopt negative rates. (CNBC)

Big name money managers — including Kyle Bass, David Tepper, and Bill Ackman — are making bearish bets against China's currency. They're lined up against Chinese policymakers who are trying to manage a more orderly decline of the yuan. (WSJ)


Barclays (BCS) and Credit Suisse (CS) have settled federal and state charges that they misled investors in their dark pools (trading venues where orders are not visible until executed). The banks will pay a combined $154.3 million. (Reuters)

Europe's largest lender HSBC (HSBC) is imposing a global hiring and pay freeze, as the bank pushes through with plans for annual cost savings of up to $5 billion by 2017. (Reuters)

Nokia (NOK) settled a long-running patent dispute with Samsung, but shares are under serious pressure overseas and in premarket U.S. trading, due to investor disappointment over the terms of the deal. (Reuters)

Two government probes into the conduct of longtime antagonists Pershing Square, run by billionaire Bill Ackman, and Herbalife (HLF) have failed to find sufficient evidence of criminal wrongdoing by either party. (Reuters)

Questar (STR) is being bought by Dominion Resources (D) for $25 per share in cash, or about $4.4 billion. Questar had closed Friday at $20.39 per share. The deal is a 22 percent premium. (CNBC)

Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A), the conglomerate run by Warren Buffett, has resumed its purchases of shares of Phillips 66 (PSX), spending about $832 million in January to boost its stake even as the oil refiner's profit margins narrowed. (Reuters)

Aetna (AET) solidly beat expectations with earnings, and also exceed forecasts on revenue on a strong performance from its government business. But the health insurer projected full year 2016 earnings below estimates. (Reuters)

The e.coli outbreak that sickened more than 50 Chipotle (CMG) customers in nine states last year is expected to be declared over as soon as today. Investigators have not been able to pinpoint the ingredient responsible for the contamination. (WSJ)

Boeing (BA) won the contract to begin preliminary work on a new fleet of Air Force One presidential jets. The initial contract is worth $25.8 million, but could end up being worth an estimated $1.65 billion. (Reuters)

With the Iowa caucuses tonight, Republican Donald Trump widened his edge over Ted Cruz, according to the latest poll in the state. Democrat Hillary Clinton narrowly leads Bernie Sanders. A blizzard, forecast for parts of Iowa, is expected to start after the caucuses. (NY Times)

BY THE NUMBERS

In the lead-up to Friday's January jobs report, the new month begins today with a flood of economic data, including December personal income and consumer spending at 8:30 a.m. ET, the ISM's manufacturing index for January at 10 a.m. ET and December construction spending at 10 a.m. ET.

Fed Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer discusses the economy in a New York speech at 1 p.m. ET. After last week's meeting, the central bank's policy statement highlighted potential economic weakness, but did not take a possible March interest rate hike off the table.

Earnings reports out this morning include Cardinal Health (CAH), Roper Technologies (ROP), and Sysco (SYY). Google parent Alphabet (GOOGL) leads this afternoon's after-the-bell list, along with Aflac (AFL), General Growth Properties (GGP), and Mattel (MAT).

"Kung Fu Panda 3" showed plenty of kick at the U.S. box office, with a solid opening weekend of $41 million, as the durable family franchise dominated moviegoing.

STOCKS TO WATCH

Yahoo (YHOO) CEO Marissa Mayer is not planning to leave the company, according to the New York Post, which also said this week's earnings may be better than many analysts expect.

Tesla Motors (TSLA) chief Elon Musk has increased his investment in the electric car maker, exercising 532,000 Tesla stock options last week. He covered the taxes with cash rather than selling holdings.

Toyota (TM) may halt production at its Japanese plants this month because of a steel shortage. That shortage stems from an explosion at the Aichi Steel plant that has impacted production of steel auto components.

Gambling revenue in Macau dropped 21.4 percent in January to nearly a near a five-year low. Las Vegas Sands (LVS) and Wynn Resorts (WYNN) both have expansive operations there.

As part of its $17 billion push between 2010 and 2020 to boost investment in Africa, Coca-Cola (KO) took a 40 percent stake in Nigerian juice and snack company, Chi. Financial terms of this deal were not disclosed.

WATERCOOLER

During Saturday's San Antonio Spurs-Cleveland Cavaliers game, ESPN introduced new technology to help make it easier for TV viewers to know whether or not a shot was a three-pointer. (Re/code)

So how much of a payday can Santa Clara, California expect from hosting Sunday's Super Bowl 50? Last year's Super Bowl in Scottsdale, Arizona produced a gross economic impact of $719.4 million for the entire state. (CNBC)