Square CFO: Sexism in tech is 'absolutely a systemic problem'

Sexism in tech is "absolutely a systemic problem," Square CFO Sarah Friar told CNBC's Deirdre Bosa on Squawk Box Asia.

Friar has held positions in a number of male-dominated industries, including tech and finance, where she was at Goldman Sachs for more than 10 years.

"It's systemic across multiple industries and I think we all have to admit that there's a problem and that will be the beginning of finding a solution," she said.

At Square, this means making both the company's employees and merchants who use its products feel they are part of an inclusive environment.

"That's the tone at the top that needs to be heard," she said.

Sexual harassment and discrimination is an inescapable topic of conversation in the tech world following bombshell allegations about Uber's corporate culture in the wake of a blog post by a female engineer who quit the company and claimed numerous incidents of sexual harassment while there.

Square shares the same building Uber in San Francisco and Friar is one of a handful of high-powered C-level female executives within the tech world. In December, CEO Jack Dorsey said 80 percent of Square's workforce reports to five women on its leadership team, including Friar.

Dorsey is also the CEO of Twitter. When asked about his ability to lead two companies at once, Friar said "I think our results speak for themselves." She added, "Jack's built a great team around him, he knows where he needs to step in and own it and when he needs to delegate."

Square beat reported strong quarterly results Wednesday, beating analyst expectations with a loss of 4 cents per share on revenue of $452 million.

Shares gained more than 8 percent after hours to trade near $15.88, climbing past the stock's all-time closing high of $15.48.

Here are all the details on Square's earnings.

— with reporting from CNBC's Christine Wang

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