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This app wants to create world peace by getting us to share our emotions for 3 minutes a day

  • LiveaMoment encourages people to take 3 minutes out of their day to reflect on their emotions and record them via an app.
  • The app then maps other people who are feeling the same way to foster a global community.
LiveaMoment founder Deborah Green
Courtesy of LiveaMoment
LiveaMoment founder Deborah Green

The LiveaMoment app claims to do what world leaders have never been able to accomplish: create peace on Earth.

"I know, that's really an app?" LiveaMoment founder Deborah Greene said cheekily. "I get it."

It may seem far-fetched technology can solve years of conflict, but Greene's theory is rooted in her "3 ft of Peace" idea: If everyone does their part and remains calm, we can have collective peace. She got the idea after working with children, one of whom told her world peace was too big for him to handle.

"I told him, 'Can you handle three feet of peace? Because that's your world,'" she explained. "If you can handle three feet of peace, and I can handle three feet, we can come together."

To create world peace, the LiveAMoment app encourages people to take 3-minute sessions daily to reflect on their own emotions. Afterwards, you choose three words that describe how you are feeling in that moment.

Your emotions are recorded on a global map, and you can see who else is feeling the same way. You can also record a 15-second video of how you are feeling at the moment to share with other app users. And if you need a daily reminder to take a time-out, there's also a function for that.

The app is free to download and record your emotions, but to watch videos from around the world, see how the rest of the world is feeling and track your own "emotional history" you'll have to pay a fee. It costs $2.99 a month, with discounts for those who sign on for longer periods. A quarter of the proceeds will go to non-profits dedicated to promoting world peace.

In addition to the app, Greene is also working on a LiveaMoment documentary series called "Our State of Peace," where she traveled around the country interviewing more than 500 people about peace. The online video blogs will be posted on a website.

"You start to look around you differently [after hearing these stories], and you realize there's x many people feeling the same way when I walk into a room," she said. "You start concerning yourself with people's emotions."