Here are the CEOs who are still on Trump's councils and here are the CEOs who have left

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Here are the CEOs who are still on Trump's councils and here are the CEOs who have left

President Donald Trump, center, speaks while Michael Dell, chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies Inc., from left, Phebe Novakovic, chairman and chief executive officer of General Dynamics Corp., Juan Luciano, chairman and chief executive officer of Archer Daniels Midland Co., Jared Kushner, senior White House advisor, Kenneth Frazier, chairman and chief executive officer of Merck & Co., Mark Fields, president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Co., and Denise Morrison, president and chief executive officer of Campbell Soup Co., listen during a meeting with manufacturing executives in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017.
Olivier Douliery | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The rhetoric between President Donald Trump and American executives continues to heat up Tuesday. Seven executives have now resigned from White House business councils in the wake of the president's perceived lackluster condemnation of Saturday's deadly white supremacist rally.

It was two days after the death of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, when Trump called out by name the KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists. Now, several executives have resigned from Trump's business councils, after the Monday morning lead of Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier, who said, "I feel a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism."

Trump doesn't appear to be missing them, however, tweeting Tuesday he has, "many to take their place."

Other executives had previously resigned from the advisory councils because of the administration's immigration policies and Trump's stance on the Paris climate accord.

Here is what the executives had to say:

  • Andrew Liveris, CEO of Dow Chemical

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Liveris, who helped organize the initial meetings of the manufacturing council, announced Monday he will be staying on it. "I condemn the violence this weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, and my thoughts and prayers are with those who lost loved ones and with the people of Virginia ... Dow will continue to work to strengthen the social and economic fabric of the communities where it operates – including supporting policies that help create employment opportunities in manufacturing and rebuild the American workforce."

    Andrew Liveris, CEO of Dow Chemical.
    Adam Jeffery | CNBC
  • Michael Dell, founder and CEO of Dell Technologies

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    The company announced Monday there will be no change in its engagement with the Trump administration.

    Michael Dell
    Getty Images
  • Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO, JPMorgan Chase

    Member of Strategic and Policy Forum.

    Status: Unclear.

    Dimon sent a memo to his employees on Monday saying, "We were all disturbed by the bigotry and violence in Charlottesville, Virginia this past weekend and pray for the victims, their families and the healing of the community."

    It went on to say, "As a firm, we have dedicated ourselves to advancing the American dream of economic opportunity for all."

    Dimon did not indicate if he would remain on the president's council.

    Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase.
    Mark Urban | CNBC
  • John Ferriola, CEO of Nucor

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Ferriola condemned the violence over the weekend, saying he and Nucor "reject the hate, bigotry and racism expressed at the demonstration." He added that, "We believe a strong manufacturing sector is the backbone of a strong economy, and we will continue to serve as a member of the White House Manufacturing Jobs Initiative."

    John Ferriola, CEO of Nucor.
    Adam Jeffery | CNBC
  • Jeff Fettig, CEO of Whirlpool

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Fettig, who is stepping down as CEO in October, said the company fosters an environment of acceptance and tolerance in the workplace and will continue on the council to "represent our industry, our 15,000 U.S. workers, and to provide input and advice on ways to create jobs and strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness."

    Fettig did not specify whether he would continue in the role after stepping down.

    Jeff Fettig, chief executive officer of Whirlpool Corp.
    Adam Bird | Bloomberg | Getty Images
  • Kenneth Frazier, CEO of Merck

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned Monday.

    Frazier kicked off the recent round of resignations Monday morning when he announced in a tweet, "As CEO of Merck and as a matter of personal conscience, I feel a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism."

    Frazier, the only African-American CEO of a major pharmaceutical company, was attacked almost immediately by Trump on Twitter. The president wrote, in light of the resignation, Frazier will have more time to "LOWER RIPOFF DRUG PRICES!"

    Kenneth Frazier, CEO of Merck.
    Mark Neuling | CNBC
  • Jeff Immelt, chairman of General Electric

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Immelt stepped down as CEO on Aug. 1 but remained on the council, and GE said he will continue to do so while he is chairman. The company said, "It is important for GE to participate in the discussion on how to drive growth and productivity in the U.S."

    Jeff Immelt
    Brian Snyder | Reuters
  • Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel

    Member of American Technology Council, Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned Monday.

    Krzanich became the third resignation Monday following Frazier and Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank. He wrote in a blog post on Intel's website that he resigned "to call attention to the serious harm our divided political climate is causing to critical issues." He added, "Politics and political agendas have sidelined the important mission of rebuilding America's manufacturing base."

    Brian Krzanich
    Heidi Petty | CNBC
  • Doug McMillon, CEO, Wal-Mart Stores

    Member of Member of Strategic and Policy Forum.

    Status: Staying on council.

    McMillon said he would be staying on the council to "strongly advocate on behalf of our associates and customers, and urge our elected officials to do their part to promote a more just, tolerant and diverse society," in a statement posted on the company's website Monday.

    McMillon also criticized the president for his initial response to the violence in Charlottesville, writing, "he missed a critical opportunity to help bring our country together."

    Doug McMillon, CEO of Wal-Mart.
    David Orrell | CNBC
  • Denise Morrison, CEO, Campbell Soup

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Morrison is staying on the council after denouncing the violence and "racist ideology" of the weekend's events. "We believe it continues to be important for Campbell to have a voice and provide input on matters that will affect our industry, our company and our employees in support of growth," the company said in a statement.

    Denise Morrison, president and chief executive officer of Campbell Soup Co.
    Peter Foley | Bloomberg | Getty Images
  • Dennis Muilenburg, CEO, Boeing

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Muilenburg plans to remain on the council, according to the company.

    Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg arrives at Trump Tower on January 17, 2017 in New York City.
    Getty Images
  • Scott Paul, president, Alliance for American Manufacturing

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned Tuesday.

    Paul wrote in a tweet Tuesday, "I'm resigning from the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative because it's the right thing for me to do."

    Scott Paul, president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing.
    Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images
  • Kevin Plank, CEO, Under Armour

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned Monday.

    Plank resigned Monday evening, becoming the first person to follow Frazier's lead. Plank said, "Under Armour engages in innovation and sports, not politics" and said he "will continue to focus my efforts on inspriing every person that they can do anything through the power of sport which promotes unity, diversity and inclusion."

    Kevin Plank, CEO of Under Armour.
    Adam Jeffery | CNBC
  • Michael Polk, CEO, Newell Brands

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Polk announced he was staying on the council early Tuesday evening, after Trump's most recent press conference walking back much of his comments from Monday.

    "I plan to continue to collaborate with other leaders from diverse industries, who represent a variety of perspectives and beliefs, to help shape strategies and develop policies that foster a more vibrant economy and more jobs in the U.S.," he said in a statement.

    Michael Polk CEO of Newell Brands
    Richard Drew | AP Photo
  • Stephen Schwarzman, CEO, Blackstone

    Member of Strategic and Policy Forum.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Schwarzman said Monday he would be staying on the council. "I believe we need to find a path forward to heal the wounds left by this tragedy and address its underlying causes. Encouraging tolerance and understanding must be a core national imperative and I will work to further that goal," he said in a statement.

    Steve Schwarzman, co-founder, chairman and chief executive officer of Blackstone Group LP.
    Mary Catherine Wellons | CNBC
  • Mark Sutton, CEO, International Paper

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Staying on council.

    Sutton condemned the violence over the weekend and is staying on the council to "work to strengthen the social and economic fabric of communities across the country by creating employment opportunities in manufacturing," spokesperson Tom Ryan said.

    Mark Sutton
    Katie Kramer | CNBC
  • Inge Thulin, CEO, 3M

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned Wednesday.

    Thulin resigned Wednesday afternoon, saying the council was longer "an effective vehicle" to advance his company's goals of "sustainability, diversity and inclusion."

    Inge G. Thulin, President and CEO of 3M Company.
    Imaginechina | AP
  • Richard Trumka, president, AFL-CIO

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned Tuesday.

    After weighing his options, Trumka said late Tuesday afternoon he and Thea Lee, the union's deputy chief of staff, would be stepping down from the council. "We cannot sit on a council for a President who tolerates bigotry and domestic terrorism. President Trump's remarks today repudiate his forced remarks yesterday about the KKK and neo-Nazis," he said in a statement. "From hollow councils to bad policy and embracing bigotry, the actions of this administration have are consistently failed working people."

    This decision comes less than two hours after the president gave a rambling press conference walking back much of his statement from Monday.

    AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka.
    Getty Images
  • Mark Weinberger, CEO, EY

    Member of Strategic and Policy Forum.

    Status: Unclear.

    Weinberger did not specifiy if he was leaving the council, but sad he was "deeply saddened and disturbed by the tragic, deplorable acts that took place in Charlottesville this weekend." He also added, "Now is the time for business leaders and government to unite to ensure we become stronger through our differences."

    Mark Weinberger
    Katie Kramer | CNBC
  • Executives who left for other reasons

    Other executives have resigned in the past for others reasons and some have stepped down as a result of leaving their company.

  • Robert Iger, CEO, Walt Disney

    Member of Strategic and Policy Forum.

    Status: Resigned June 1.

    Iger left the council after the U.S. announced it would withdraw from the Paris climate accords, tweeting, "As a matter of principle, I've resigned from the President's Council over the #ParisAgreement withdrawal."

    Bob Iger, Chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company.
    Michael Newberg | CNBC
  • Travis Kalanick, founder, Uber

    Member of Strategic and Policy Forum.

    Status: Resigned Feb. 2.

    Kalanick was the first executive to resign from one of Trump's councils, citing backlash from associating with the administration in the wake of a controversial executive order concerning immigration. In a memo to staff, Kalanick wrote, "Joining the group was not meant to be an endorsement of the President or his agenda but unfortunately it has been misinterpreted to be exactly that."

    Kalanick also rejected any ban on immigrants or refugees in the memo.

    Travis Kalanick.
    David Orrell | CNBC
  • Elon Musk, CEO, Tesla

    Member of Manufacturing Jobs Initiative.

    Status: Resigned June 1.

    Musk resigned from the council following Trump's announcement he would be withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate accord. Musk wrote in a tweet, "Am departing presidential councils. Climate change is real. Leaving Paris is not good for America or the world.

    Bill Brown and Marillyn Hewson, members of the American Manufacturing Council, declined to comment to CNBC. Alex Gorsky, Greg Hayes, James Kamsickas, Richard Kyle, Doug Oberhelman, Michael Polk, Inge Thulin and Wendell Weeks, also members of the manufacturing council, didn't immediately return CNBC's request for comment.

    Toby Cosgrove, Kevin Warsh, Jack Welch and Daniel Yergin, all members of the Strategic and Policy Forum, declined to comment to CNBC. Paul Atkins, Mary Barra, Larry Fink, Rich Lesser, Jim McNerney, Adebayo Ogunlesi and Ginni Rometty, members of the Strategic and Policy Forum, did not return CNBC's request for comment.

    Correction: This report has been updated to accurately reflect the first name of Dow Chemical's CEO.

    Elon Musk
    Aaron P. Bernstein | Reuters