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US Treasury yields edge higher as investors look to Jackson Hole meeting

  • Thursday marks the start of the 2017 Economic Policy Symposium on "Fostering a Dynamic Global Economy" at Jackson Hole, where leading central bankers are set to meet.
  • The meeting comes amid debate about whether keeping stimulative policy measures from the Financial Crisis is still warranted.

U.S. Treasury yields rose on Thursday, as investors turned their attention to a monetary policy symposium at Jackson Hole.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note sat in the black at around 2.187 percent at 2:24 p.m. ET, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was higher at 2.763 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

Symbol
Yield
 
Change
%Change
US 3-MO
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US 1-YR
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US 2-YR
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US 5-YR
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US 10-YR
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US 30-YR
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Thursday marks the start of the 2017 Economic Policy Symposium on "Fostering a Dynamic Global Economy" at Jackson Hole, where leading central bankers are set to meet. The meeting comes amid debate about whether keeping stimulative policy measures from the Financial Crisis is still warranted.

"There's sort of an 'end-to-an-era' feel to this meeting," said Luke Bartholomew, investment manager at Aberdeen Standard Investments. "I think what's remarkable about all this is how tame credit markets have been in the face of [potentially] tightening monetary policy."

"The taper tantrum in 2013 was all about the angst of tighter monetary policy and now rates have been much more behaved," Bartholomew said.

Over the three-day event, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and European Central Bank President Mario Draghi are both set to speak at the symposium, with investors watching the event closely for any indications when it comes to monetary policy outlook.

Kansas City Fed President Esther George told CNBC on Thursday that the economy was strong enough to handle more rate hikes, despite recent readings of weak inflation.

"I think we should continue with the gradual rate path," she said from the annual symposium. "While we haven't hit 2 percent, I'm reminded that 2 percent is a target over the long term, and in the context of a growing economy, of jobs being added, I don't think it's an issue that we should be particularly concerned about unless we see something change."

Ahead of the event, the ECB President gave very little away in terms of clues to the strategic future of the euro zone's monetary policy situation, when speaking in Germany on Wednesday.

"They try to downplay this as a nonevent but everything they talk about will be relevant to the monetary policy discussion," said Gene Tannuzzo, portfolio manager at Columbia Threadneedle Investments. "What we're going to look for is more clues about coordination between central bankers across the world."

In data news, jobless claims totaled 234,000. Existing home sales data showed an unexpected fall in July.

Meanwhile politics is expected to linger at the back of investors' minds after U.S. President Donald Trump said he'd be willing to go as far as letting the government shut down, at a rally on Tuesday night, if he wasn't able to have his border wall with Mexico funded.

While the news weighed on U.S. stocks during Wednesday's trade, concerns appeared to ease overnight for investors overseas.

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Correction: Luke Bartholomew works at Aberdeen Standard Investments. A previous version of this story misstated the company's name.