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Flynn's attorney met with Russia probe investigators Monday, hinting at possible plea talks: Report

  • More evidence emerged Monday that former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn may be seeking to cooperate with investigators working for Special Counsel Robert Mueller.
  • Flynn attorney Robert Kelner visited the offices of the special counsel in Washington Monday morning, ABC News reported.
  • The visit comes on the heels of reports, confirmed by the president's attorneys, that Flynn's lawyers had stopped communicating with the president's legal team regarding the criminal investigation.
National Security Adviser Mike Flynn listens to President Trump during a listening session with cyber security experts in the Roosevelt Room the White House in Washington, DC on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017.
Jabin Botsford | The Washington Post | Getty Images
National Security Adviser Mike Flynn listens to President Trump during a listening session with cyber security experts in the Roosevelt Room the White House in Washington, DC on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017.

More evidence emerged Monday that former national security advisor Michael Flynn may be seeking to cooperate with investigators working for Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Flynn attorney Robert Kelner visited the offices of the special counsel in Washington Monday morning, ABC News reported, amid speculation that Flynn had begun working to reach a plea deal.

The visit comes on the heels of reports, confirmed by the president's attorneys, that Flynn's lawyers had stopped communicating with the president's legal team regarding the criminal investigation.

The New York Times was the first to report on the split between the Trump and Flynn teams.

The former FBI director is investigating the Trump campaign, Russian meddling in the U.S. election last year and other related concerns.

The most likely explanation for the two camps to cut off contact was that Flynn had started cooperating with investigators, Sol Wisenberg, former deputy independent counsel under Kenneth Starr, told CNBC last week.

Kelner, who did not respond to a request for comment from CNBC, released a statement in March that stoked reports that Flynn was seeking immunity.

Flynn "has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit," Kelner wrote.

Flynn is facing federal, congressional and military investigations into undisclosed payments from foreign governments, including Russia and Turkey.

Flynn resigned as national security advisor after 24 days following reports that he had misled Vice President Mike Pence about a call with a top Russian official regarding U.S. sanctions on the country.

Pressure on Flynn to cooperate with investigators increased after prosecutors began focusing on his son, Michael G. Flynn, ABC News reported, citing sources familiar with the investigation.

A spokesman for the special counsel's office declined to comment to CNBC.

Read the full ABC News report here.

WATCH: Michael Flynn cuts ties with Trump