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US futures point to a negative open as US government shutdown weighs

  • On Saturday, the U.S. government shut down after a bill that would have kept government funded through mid-February was voted down in the Senate
  • Halliburton, Netflix, TD Ameritrade and Brown & Brown are some of the names set to publish their latest earnings
Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Brendan McDermid | Reuters
Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

U.S. stock index futures fell into the red ahead of the open Monday, as investors pondered what the government shutdown will mean for markets.

Dow Jones industrial average futures declined 49 points, while S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures fell 2 points and 3.5 points, respectively.

On Saturday, the U.S. government shut down after a bill that would have kept government funded through mid-February was voted against in the Senate. This marked the first U.S. government shutdown since 2013.

An agreement to stop the political deadlock has yet to be secured, meaning shutdown concerns are expected to linger.

On Monday, the Senate is expected to try to restore federal funding again, whether on a temporary basis or for longer, while trying to fix an issue over immigration. A vote by the Senate is set to be held at 12 p.m. ET Monday that, if successful, would provide funding to the government.

Markets in Asia, however, closed higher, while Europe traded relatively flat on Monday.

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While concerns over the shutdown are set to linger, earnings are likely to sway some sentiment Monday. Halliburton, Netflix, TD Ameritrade and Brown & Brown are some of the names set to publish their latest financial figures.

Oil prices fluctuated around the flatline, however sentiment was boosted after comments from Saudi Arabia. The Middle Eastern country said that cooperation between oil producers who have slashed production to lift prices would continue past this year, Reuters reported.

No major data or speeches by U.S. Federal Reserve members are set to take place.

—CNBC's Jacob Pramuk and Fred Imbert contributed to this report