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Saudi crown prince says 'only death' can stop him ruling

  • When asked by CBS' Norah O'Donnell if anything could stop him ruling, Bin Salman replied: "Only death."
  • The interview came on the eve of the prince's extended visit to the U.S. in which he is scheduled to tour a number of cities and meet with President Donald Trump.
  • Saudi Arabia's Bin Salman is widely expected to try and encourage American investors to put money into the kingdom, while also looking to promote his plans to enact sweeping economic and social reforms in Riyadh.
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative (FII) conference in Riyadh, on October 24, 2017.
FAYEZ NURELDINE | AFP | Getty Images
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative (FII) conference in Riyadh, on October 24, 2017.

Saudi Arabia's powerful crown prince has said "only death" can prevent him from ruling over the kingdom for several years to come.

"Only God knows how long one will live, if one would live 50 years or not, but if things go their normal ways, then that's to be expected," Mohammed bin Salman said during a wide-ranging interview that aired on CBS news show 60 Minutes on Sunday evening.

When asked by CBS' Norah O'Donnell if anything could stop him ruling, Bin Salman replied: "Only death."

The interview came on the eve of the prince's extended visit to the U.S. in which he is scheduled to tour a number of cities and meet with President Donald Trump.

Saudi Arabia's Bin Salman is widely expected to try and encourage American investors to put money into the kingdom, while also looking to promote his plans to enact sweeping economic and social reforms in Riyadh.

Last week, he said Saudi Arabia would be prepared to pursue a nuclear weapon if its regional rival Iran was to obtain one. Bin Salman's comments heightened concerns about nuclear proliferation at a time when the Saudis are seeking foreign technology for their nuclear energy program, including from the U.S.

His remarks also came two months ahead of a deadline that could see Trump scrap an accord that limits Iran's nuclear program.

Saudi Arabia and Iran are on opposite sides of conflicts in Syria and Yemen.

— CNBC's Tom DiChristopher contributed to this report.