Cambridge Analytica offices in London briefly evacuated due to a suspicious package

  • Police in London removed cordons and reopened the offices of analytics firm Cambridge Analytica, after a suspicious package sparked a brief evacuation on Thursday afternoon.
  • Cambridge Analytica is in the midst of a media firestorm after an undercover sting operation caught senior executives boasting about psychological manipulation, entrapment techniques and fake news campaigns.
  • The company's CEO has been suspended and the country's Information Commissioner is seeking a warrant to raid the office.
The U.K. headquarters of Cambridge Analytica on March 20, 2018, in London, England.
Jack Taylor | Getty Images
The U.K. headquarters of Cambridge Analytica on March 20, 2018, in London, England.

Police in London removed cordons and reopened the offices of analytics firm Cambridge Analytica, after a suspicious package sparked a brief evacuation on Thursday afternoon.

Police said they were called at 1:26 p.m. London time Thursday to reports of a suspicious package at the building in New Oxford Street.

"The building has been evacuated as a precaution," police initially said. "No injuries have been reported." Around half an hour later, the police gave the all clear and said that the incident was over.

Cambridge Analytica is in the midst of a media firestorm after an undercover sting operation caught senior executives boasting about psychological manipulation, entrapment techniques and fake news campaigns. The company's CEO has been suspended and the country's Information Commissioner is seeking a warrant to raid the office.

The London Met Police put road closures in place during the evacuation, while emergency services dealt with the incident.

Alongside social media giant Facebook, the London-based elections consultancy is at the center of an ongoing dispute over the alleged harvesting and use of personal data. The allegations have heightened concerns over whether such data was then used to try and influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the Brexit vote. Both companies deny any wrongdoing.

—CNBC's Sam Meredith contributed to this article.