Cramer: Facebook should hire a special counsel to show it has nothing to hide

  • Facebook should hire a special counsel to investigate its data leak scandal or else it'll appear like it has "something to hide," CNBC's Jim Cramer says.
  • Cramer reiterated his recent calls for the social network hire an "internal special prosecutor" to get to the bottom of its data-leak scandal.

Facebook should hire a special counsel to investigate its data leak scandal or else it'll appear like it has something to hide, CNBC's Jim Cramer said Tuesday.

In a tweet early Tuesday, Cramer said: "Another day, no outside counsel hired by $FB to investigate. You would only not do this if you had something to hide.. SO not faith being built..."

Later on "Squawk on the Street," Cramer said Facebook should "bring in some 'adult' ... and have him or her investigate everything."

Cramer first suggested last week that the social network should hire what he called an "internal special prosecutor" to get to the bottom of the Cambridge Analytica data misuse.

On Monday, the Federal Trade Commission confirmed that it's investigating the company's data practices.

Additionally, Facebook said it would send a top executive to appear in front of U.K. lawmakers, but not CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Christopher Wylie, the whistleblower in the scandal, told U.K. lawmakers on Tuesday that the election of Donald Trump prompted him speak out about the practices being employed by Cambridge Analytica, the political firm that worked on the Trump presidential campaign.

Cramer, host of "Mad Money," had previously called out Zuckerberg and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg for being notably silent for days after reports on March 17 that Cambridge Analytica had harvested the data from more than 50 million users of the social network without their permission. The data were used to target ads promoting Trump's 2016 candidacy, according to The New York Times and The Observer. Cambridge Analytica has denied the allegations.

Zuckerberg and Sandberg went on an apology tour late last week.

Shares of Facebook have declined about 13.5 percent from the close on Friday, March 16, to the close on Monday, March 26.

Facebook did not immediately respond to CNBC's request for comment on Cramer's remarks.

Sign Up for Our Newsletter Morning Squawk

CNBC's before the bell news roundup
Get this delivered to your inbox, and more info about about our products and services.
By signing up for newsletters, you are agreeing to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.