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Here's how to find what Amazon knows about you

Key Points
  • Amazon has a bunch of data on you, but you've provided it all over the years.
  • It has a record of everything you've purchased, hundreds of items it thinks you'll like, everything you've asked Amazon Alexa and more.
  • You can't download a single file that has all of your data, so we'll show you how to find everything Amazon knows about you.
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Here's how to find what Amazon knows about you

Unlike Facebook, Twitter and Google, Amazon doesn't offer an easy way to download a file of everything it knows about you. Instead, you'll need to do some digging.

I did a bit of that for you, to show you an example of the sort of data Amazon might have on you if, like me, you use its products and services frequently.

We've already published posts showing the data that Facebook, Google and Twitter have compiled. Before we begin, here's how to find out what those companies know about you:

To begin your own search:

  • Log in to Amazon.
  • Navigate to the top right of the screen and hover your mouse over "Account & Lists."
  • Begin navigating through your account, lists, orders and more.

Here's what Amazon knows about me:

Everything I've ever ordered, back to a VHS tape I bought in 2006
CNBC Tech: Amazon history

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Select "Order History."
My Amazon product browsing history, dating back to last year
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 16

Amazon doesn't show me everything I've ever looked for, but it has a lot of my history. You can find yours by logging in to Amazon and then:

  • Select "Browsing History" at the top of the Amazon homepage.
  • Keep scrolling down to load more items.

To delete your history and/or stop Amazon from storing it on your account:

  • Follow the steps above.
  • Select "Manage history" on the top right of the page.
  • Select "Remove all items" and toggle browsing history to "off."
The addresses where I've lived and worked, including family members who I've purchased items for
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 2

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Select "Your Account."
  • Select "Your Addresses."
A wish list of items that I've planned to purchase but never did. This goes back to 2013
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 3

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Select "Your Lists."
Hundreds of products Amazon thinks I'd be interested in buying, based on my purchase history
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 4

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Select "Your recommendations."
Every e-book I've purchased from Amazon dating back to 2008
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 5

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Select "Manage your content and devices."
Every song I've ever played using Amazon Music over the last four years
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 7
  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Select Your Music Library.
  • Choose "Played" under "Recents" on the left side of the screen.
  • Scroll all the way down the list.
Pictures and other files I have stored on Amazon Drive
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 8

Find yours:

  • Select "Account & Lists."
  • Select "Your Amazon Drive" or "Your Amazon Photos." The drive has both.
Movies and TV shows that I have on my Amazon "watchlist"
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 9

Find yours:

  • Select "Account & Lists."
  • Select "Your watchlist"
Android applications I've downloaded from the Amazon App Store — that have access to my location, information on my wireless networks and more.
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 10

Find yours:

  • Select "Account & Lists."
  • Select "Your Android Apps & Devices."
That I prefer to have my Amazon ads personalized 
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 11

Here's how to turn this off:

  • Go to Account & Lists.
  • Select your account.
  • Select "Advertising Preferences" under "Email alerts, messages, and ads.
  • Select "Do not personalize ads from Amazon for this internet browser."
A list of 52 devices I've used to access Amazon Prime Video
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 12

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Choose "Your account."
  • Select "Video settings" under "Digital content and devices."
All of the credit cards I've used, including expired cards
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 13

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Choose "Your account."
  • Select "Your 1-Click Preferences."
Wi-Fi passwords that are saved (they're encrypted and stored on Amazon's servers.)
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 14

Find yours:

  • Select Account & Lists.
  • Choose "Your account."
  • Select "Content and devices" under "Digital content and devices."
  • Choose "Settings."
  • Scroll down and select "Saved Wi-Fi passwords."
  • You can delete this encrypted file by selecting "Delete."
A history of everything I've asked Amazon Alexa from my Echo
CNBC Tech: Amazon history 15

Find yours:

  • Navigate to "https://alexa.amazon.com
  • Select "settings" on the left side of the screen.
  • Scroll down to "Alexa Account."
  • Select "History."