Airlines

Cramer recalls his own two crash landings in airplanes after Southwest's tragic engine failure

Key Points
  • Pilots and cabin crew deserve much more credit for their bravery in situations such as the Southwest Airlines engine failure, CNBC's Jim Cramer says.
  • "I've been in two crash landings in my life," Cramer says. The pilots and cabin crew "were amazing."
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Cramer recalls his own two crash landings in airplanes after Southwest's tragic engine failure

Pilots and cabin crew deserve much more credit for their bravery in emergency airline situations such as the Southwest Airlines engine failure that resulted in one passenger's death, CNBC's Jim Cramer said Wednesday.

"I've been in two crash landings in my life ... where there were no wheels," said Cramer, who declined to name the airlines involved in those incidents. "And the coolness of the pilots, the coolness of the stewards ... these people were amazing."

"These people deserve a lot of credit," Cramer told CNBC's "Squawk on the Street." "Both times, I was reassured quickly. One of them was a faux landing, and it bounced, bounced, bounced and finally the last bounce right at the end of the runway."

The NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the blown jet engine that set off a terrifying in-flight chain of events Tuesday. Debris from the engine shattered a passenger's window, and a businesswoman was nearly sucked out of the plane through the hole. She later died.

The plane, a Boeing 737-700, was carrying 149 people on a flight from New York's La Guardia Airport to Dallas when it made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

The pilot landing the damaged plane was Tammie Jo Shults, one the first female fighter pilots in the U.S. military, according to The Associated Press. She is being praised for her calming presence while trying to land the plane and for her "nerves of steel."

A preliminary examination of the engine showed evidence of "metal fatigue," according to the NTSB. Southwest said that it is accelerating its inspections of the engine type that was involved in the accident and that they will likely be completed within 30 days. The tragedy was the airline's first on-board passenger fatality due to an accident in its history, and the first fatal U.S. commercial plane accident since 2009.