McDonald's to add self-order kiosks to 1,000 stores each quarter

  • McDonald's will upgrade 1,000 stores with kiosk and mobile order technology every quarter for the next eight to nine quarters.
  • International markets like Canada, Australia and the U.K. are already fully integrated with kiosk service and mobile ordering.
  • McDonald's has also been exploring delivery in the U.S. in an attempt to meet customer demand and changes in how consumers want to get their food.

As McDonald's seeks to modernize its business, the company is placing a big bet on mobile and other tech platforms.

McDonald's has been systematically adding self-service ordering kiosks and table service to stores as it works to "build a better McDonald's."

"What we're finding is when people dwell more, they select more," CEO Steve Easterbrook told CNBC on "Squawk on the Street" on Monday. "There's a little bit of an average check boost."

In fact, the company plans to upgrade 1,000 stores with this technology every quarter for the next eight to nine quarters.

"If you think about only two years ago, if you were a customer there were two ways you can get served at McDonald's," Easterbrook said. "You walked to the front counter and line up and take your drink and find a table or you go through the drive through. We're introducing many options. They can order through mobile, they can come curbside and we'll run it out as well as the existing traditional ways. You can pay in different ways and customize your food in different ways. I think we're trying to add more choice and variety."

Kiosks for ordering food sit in the dining area of a McDonald's restaurant located inside the company's new corporate headquarters on June 4, 2018 in Chicago.
Scott Olson | Getty Images
Kiosks for ordering food sit in the dining area of a McDonald's restaurant located inside the company's new corporate headquarters on June 4, 2018 in Chicago.

International markets like Canada, Australia and the U.K. are already fully integrated with kiosk service and mobile ordering. Locations in France and Germany, too, are almost completely transformed with this new technology.

"The U.S. is a little bit behind," Easterbrook said.

The burger giant has also been exploring delivery in the U.S. in an attempt to meet customer demand and changes in how consumers want to get their food.

McDonald's already has a large delivery presence in Asia, which accounts for 10 percent of system sales in that market, and is hoping to capitalize on the growing industry demand by offering delivery in the U.S. It is currently testing out several models, both in-house and via third-party providers.

The company has previously stated that 75 percent of the population in its top five markets — the U.S., France, the U.K., Germany and Canada — are within three miles of a McDonald's and 85 percent are within five miles of a chain.

WATCH: A look inside McDonald's new Chicago headquarters