Trump accuses social media companies of interfering in 2016 and 2018 elections

  • Trump tells The Daily Caller he thinks big tech firms "already have" intervened in the November midterm elections.
  • He claims they intervened in the 2016 presidential election on behalf of Hillary Clinton.
  • The president warns tech firms not to continue with alleged bias against conservatives.
President Donald Trump
Leah Millis | Reuters
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump accused social networks of interfering in the 2016 presidential election and November's midterm elections.

Trump told online conservative publication The Daily Caller he thinks big tech firms "already have" intervened in the midterms, and said Facebook and Google intervened in the 2016 presidential election on behalf of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

"I mean the true interference in the last election was that — if you look at all, virtually all of those companies are super liberal companies in favor of Hillary Clinton," Trump said, according to the outlet.

"Maybe I did a better job because I'm good with the Twitter and I'm good at social media, but the truth is they were all on Hillary Clinton's side, and if you look at what was going on with Facebook and with Google and all of it, they were very much on her side."

The president also warned tech firms not to continue with alleged bias against conservatives.

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Trump accused Google last week of rigging search results to prioritize negative coverage and left-leaning news outlets. He warned the issue "will be addressed," suggesting regulatory consequences for social media companies.

Trump then mentioned rivals Facebook and Twitter by name, saying all three companies were "treading on very, very troubled territory and they have to be careful." Google, Twitter and Facebook have denied political bias in the algorithmic tailoring of news content.

C-level executives from social media giants Twitter and Facebook appeared before U.S. lawmakers on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. The representatives testified on matters including election meddling by foreign actors and "fake news."

Google was absent from the hearing as Alphabet CEO Larry Page and Google CEO Sundar Pichai declined invitations from the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee. Google instead offered up its top lawyer, Kent Walker, but the committee rejected this offer.

The vice chairman of the committee, Sen. Mark Warner, said in a tweet Tuesday that Page "should be there too." "It's not too late for @Google to step up," the Virginia Democrat added.