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Special counsel Mueller's report has been released to the public — read key findings here

Key Points
  • Mueller said Trump's "efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests."
  • The investigation found that the Trump campaign "expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts" even though the probe did not establish coordination.
  • When Jeff Sessions told Trump about Mueller's appointment, Trump slumped back in his chair and said, "Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I'm f----d."
The silhouette of Robert Mueller, former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and special counsel for the U.S. Department of Justice, is seen as he leaves the U.S. Capitol Building following a meeting with the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, June 20, 2017.
Zach Gibson | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Special counsel Robert Mueller found "substantial evidence" that President Donald Trump's firing of James Comey was due to the FBI director's "unwillingness to publicly state that the president was not personally under investigation" — but Mueller's team concluded that Congress can make a determination on whether Trump obstructed justice.

Those were among the findings of Mueller's 22-month investigation of Russia's interference in the 2016 election. The Justice Department released the 448-page report Thursday in redacted form.

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Mueller report: Cannot conclude no criminal conduct occurred

Mueller said his investigation did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference campaign. The team defined coordination as "an agreement — tacit or express — between the Trump Campaign" and the Kremlin.

Here's the full report.

Some of Mueller's key findings on the Russian influence campaign include:

  • The Russian government interfered in the 2016 presidential election in "sweeping and systematic fashion."
  • Russia's efforts to target the U.S. through the Internet Research Agency influence operation began in 2014.
  • That campaign began as a generalized program designed years earlier to undermine the U.S. electoral system, but by early 2016 morphed into a targeted operation to favor Trump and harm candidate Hillary Clinton.
  • Mueller found that the Trump campaign "expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts" even though the probe did not establish coordination.
  • Content from a Russian IRA-controlled Twitter account was cited or retweeted by Trump campaign officials and surrogates, including Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump, Kellyanne Conway, Brad Parscale and Michael Flynn.
  • The IRA, posing as U.S. political activists, contacted persons affiliated with the Trump campaign in an effort to coordinate pro-Trump rallies.
  • Whistleblower organization WikiLeaks, which is accused of accepting and publishing stolen Democrats' emails allegedly hacked by Russian intelligence, asked Trump Jr. to tweet a link in order to help them with "digging through leaked emails." Trump Jr. tweeted the link two days later.
  • The Trump campaign planned a press strategy and communications campaign based on the possible release of Clinton emails by WikiLeaks, according to Rick Gates, Trump's former deputy campaign chairman.
  • Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort instructed his business partner Gates to provide alleged Russian operative Konstantin Kilimnik "internal polling data." But Mueller's team "did not identify evidence of a connection between Manafort's sharing polling data and Russia's interference in the election."
  • Investigators found "some evidence" that Trump knew about Michael Flynn's calls with the Russian ambassador — conversations Flynn was later charged with lying about — but the evidence was "inconclusive."
  • Mueller did not subpoena Trump because it would create a substantial delay at a late stage in the investigation.
  • The special counsel considered Trump's written answers, submitted in lieu of a face-to-face interview, "inadequate" but still decided against a subpoena fight.
  • The special counsel accepted the Office of Legal Counsel's view on indicting a sitting president when making a determination about whether Trump obstructed justice. Apart from that precedent, Mueller's investigators said they "recognized" that accusing Trump of a crime "would place burdens on the president's capacity to govern and potentially preempt constitutional process for addressing presidential misconduct."
  • Former White House counsel Don McGahn was disturbed by Trump's requests in June 2017 that McGahn recommend to the acting attorney general that Mueller "must be removed." The report says McGahn decided "that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre."
  • When then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions told Trump that Mueller had been appointed special counsel, a notetaker for Sessions wrote that Trump slumped back in his chair and said, "Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I'm fucked."
  • The report states: "The President's efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests."

The redacted version of the report comes less than a month after Barr released a four-page letter summarizing what he called the "principal conclusions" in Mueller's report, including that the investigation did not find any conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Barr also said that Mueller's report "did not exonerate" the president regarding obstruction of justice, but he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein concluded there wasn't sufficient evidence to charge Trump.

The attorney general's summary was made public March 24, two days after Mueller delivered the report to the Justice Department. Democrats, particularly majority lawmakers and committee chairs in the House, have been pressuring Barr to release the full report, without redactions.

CNBC is reviewing it now and will continue to update this report.