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Don't trust the S&P 500's June jump just yet: Strategist

Key Points
  • Investors should be "hesitant" about investing in stocks over the next weeks despite the S&P 500's 5% rally so far this month, J.P. Morgan strategist Jason Hunter says.
  • Bad news from this month's G-20 meeting could send stocks spiraling into a correction, and investors could get burned, he says.
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Brendan McDermid | Reuters

Investors should be "hesitant" about investing in stocks over the next weeks despite the 's 5% rally so far this month, a J.P. Morgan strategist told CNBC on Tuesday.

Bad news from this month's G-20 meeting could send stocks spiraling into a correction, and investors could get burned, Jason Hunter, J.P. Morgan's head of global fixed income and U.S. equity technical strategy, said on CNBC's "Fast Money." "This has been a very headline-driven market over the last several months."

U.S. stocks closed lower Tuesday, taking a breather after posting strong gains to start off June. Prior to Tuesday, the Dow posted six straight days of gains, while the S&P 500 posted five. President Donald Trump's trade deal with Mexico over the weekend and the hopes that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates this year have lifted investor sentiment.

Trump is expected to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit, which is scheduled for June 28-29 in Osaka, Japan. The leaders of 19 nations and the European Union are expected to attend. Trump confirmed to CNBC on Monday that additional tariffs on Chinese goods will be levied if Xi does not attend the meeting.

The U.S. last month already increased duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese products from 10% to 25%. China announced plans to raise tariff rates on $60 billion in U.S. goods. The trade dispute has rattled financial markets and threatens to drag the global economy.

Hunter also said investors should watch semiconductors in particular, after headlines last month that some semiconductor makers were cutting ties with China's Huawei amid the trade dispute.

"You want to watch how the headlines hit before you invest in this group," Hunter said.