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'Shark Tank' investor Herjavec: 'Running a $300 million business,' low rates matter most to me

Key Points
  • "Shark Tank" investor Robert Herjavec says he's bullish on the economy because of low interest rates.
  • "As a guy running a $300 million business, what impacts me the most is the cost of money," Herjavec says.
  • "If I can borrow at 2% or 3% and grow by 10% or 20%, I'm going to take that all day long," he says.
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Shark Tank's Robert Herjavec doesn't think there will be a recession

"Shark Tank" investor Robert Herjavec said Friday on CNBC that he's bullish on the economy because of low interest rates.

"I look at the trends, I look at China and all the other trade issues, but as a guy running a $300 million business, what impacts me the most is the cost of money," said Herjavec, who founded cybersecurity firm Herjavec Group.

"And you can not beat the interest rates today. It costs me nothing to borrow money today. As a business owner, that's really powerful."

The Federal Reserve lowered its benchmark interest rate by 25 basis points last week to 1.75% to 2%, its second cut this year. In July, central bankers also approved a quarter-point reduction; at the time, it was the Fed's first rate cut in more than a decade.

The lowering of interest rates comes amid a global economic slowdown and a long-running trade war between the U.S. and China. Wall Street has expressed concern that the trade war — and the uncertainty it brings — could drive the U.S. economy into a recession.

Herjavec stressed he was speaking only from the perspective of a private business owner, but still expressed optimism about the economy overall.

He said he believes there is a lot of capital investment underway. On Thursday, though, the government said U.S. business investment declined at a 1.0% annualized rate last quarter, the most sizable drop since the fourth quarter of 2015.

"I don't know if we're going into recession. It was all the buzz a month or two ago. But I'm feeling very bullish," Herjavec said. "If I can borrow at 2% or 3% and grow by 10% or 20%, I'm going to take that all day long."

But Herjavec said the low interest rates are not without downside.

"It's putting a lot of pressure on funds to get greater returns, so the amount of liquidity in the market is not great for somebody like me," he explained. "I'm competing against people that are raising incredible amounts of money. They really have no game plan to get to profitability. And that's always dangerous."