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'When tech stocks go down they're not necessarily out,' Jim Cramer says

Key Points
  • "When you focus on the technology that's changing the world, it reminds you that when tech stocks go down they're not necessarily out," CNBC's Jim Cramer says.
  • "I wasn't worried about AMD or Nvidia" when their stocks took hits on their latest quarterly reports, "because I came [to San Francisco] regularly so I know how indispensable their chips have become to the modern world," the "Mad Money" host says.
  • "In that case, it's crazy to sell these stocks when they report good quarters with a tiny bit of irrelevant hair on them," he argues.
VIDEO2:5002:50
Investing, buying the dip in technology stocks, with Jim Cramer

CNBC's Jim Cramer on Monday said he took his show on the road to tech hotspot San Francisco to expose retail investors to the emerging technologies that are becoming more and more intimately involved in people's lives.

Understanding these tech companies will help individual investors make better decisions in owning shares of tech companies such as chipmakers Nvidia and Advanced Micro Devices, especially when their stocks take dips that are buying opportunities, the "Mad Money" host explained.

"Tech is how good businesses become great ones. It's how they take themselves to the next level, and I want to show you how that works," Cramer said.

"When you focus on the technology that's changing the world, it reminds you that when tech stocks go down they're not necessarily out," he said.

AMD shares traded nearly 3% lower and Nvidia dropped more than 4% in the wake of their recent quarterly reports in October and November, respectively, according to Factset. Nvidia has since rallied almost 6% to $212.28 from its lowest intraday trade, and AMD has since surged from its low point more than 24% to $39.88 per share as of Monday's close.

Cramer said the dips were worth buying because the companies "hadn't done anything wrong."

"The stocks were reacting to the charts, to the chatter, to the oh-so-slight revisions on one or two lines of gibberish that control absolutely nothing," he said. "I wasn't worried about AMD or Nvidia ... because I came out here regularly so I know how indispensable their chips have become to the modern world."

Their semiconductors are indispensable because data is a very valuable commodity, the host explained. Companies are seeking user data for various business purposes in almost all industries, including music, television, food, retail, news, cars and a litany of others.

Chipmakers build products that can process information. AMD makes semiconductor devices for computer processing. Nvidia produces chips for processing graphics that can be used for driving cars and in video games.

"In that case, it's crazy to sell these stocks when they report good quarters with a tiny bit of irrelevant hair on them," Cramer said. "Nobody will remember that fly in the ointment a week later."

VIDEO8:2208:22
Jim Cramer talks investing, buying the dip in technology stocks

Disclosure: Cramer's charitable trust owns shares of Nvidia.

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