Health and Science

CDC expands the official list of coronavirus symptoms

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Key Points
  • The previous list of symptoms included fever, cough and shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.
  • The CDC now says chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell are also common indicators of the coronavirus.
  • A research team at King's College London identified a loss of taste and smell as one of the best ways to detect whether someone has Covid-19.
Medical staff in protective suits treat a patient with pneumonia caused by the new coronavirus at the Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, January 27, 2020.
China Daily | Reuters

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added six new symptoms of Covid-19 to its website as scientists gather more data on the coronavirus and patients show "a wide range of symptoms."

The previous list of symptoms included fever, cough and shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. The CDC now says chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and a sudden loss of taste or smell are also common indicators of the coronavirus.

Emergency warning signs include trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, and bluish lips or face. People experiencing those symptoms should seek medical attention immediately, according to the CDC. 

A research team at King's College London identified a loss of taste and smell as one of the best ways to detect whether someone has Covid-19, according to a study published earlier this month. Its data analyzed responses of more than 400,000 people who had one or more suspected symptoms of the disease. The results said that 59% of those who tested positive for the virus reported a loss of smell and taste. 

Muscle pain and chills are also commonly observed among those who have the coronavirus. CNN host Chris Cuomo, who contracted the virus, said on his show he experienced "fever, body aches and tremors."

As the deadly pandemic continues to infect and kill thousands of people globally, hospitals are increasingly seeing developments of unconventional complications in patients such as blood clots, according to The Washington Post.

The coronavirus has infected more than 965,000 people in the U.S., killing at least 54,000, according to data Monday from Johns Hopkins University. Globally, the virus has infected more than 2.9 million people, killing at least 207,000.

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