Transportation

American Airlines to resume full flights in July amid coronavirus pandemic

Key Points
  • American Airlines announced Friday that it will resume full flights starting July 1 amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 
  • The airline will continue to notify passengers when their planes are full and allow them to switch to less crowded flights at no extra cost through Sept. 30.
  • Passengers with flights booked through Sept. 30 can also change their flights, including adjusting origin and destination cities, without incurring a travel change fee. 
An American Airlines Group worker wears a protective mask and stands behind a protective barrier while checking in a traveler at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, June 9, 2020.
Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg via Getty Images

American Airlines announced Friday that it will resume full flights starting July 1 amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic

The airline will continue to notify passengers when their planes are full and allow them to switch to less crowded flights at no extra cost through Sept. 30. Passengers with flights booked through Sept. 30 can also change their flights, including adjusting origin and destination cities, without incurring a travel change fee but will have to pay for any difference in the fare.

Starting June 30, American said it will begin asking customers during the flight check-in process whether they have been free of Covid-19 symptoms for the past 14 days. Travelers will be able to complete the coronavirus symptom checklist using self-service machines at airports or during online check-in. The airline is continuing to require passengers and employees to wear face masks on flights unless they have a medical reason not to. 

"Our customers trust us to make every aspect of their journey safe. We won't let them down," said Alison Taylor, American's chief customer officer, in a statement. "We will continue to refine and update our practices based on the latest information from health authorities and our own Travel Health Advisory Panel."

United Airlines introduced a coronavirus symptom questionnaire earlier in June, but has not yet put a capacity limit on flights. Other carriers, including Southwest Airlines and Delta Air Lines, still have restrictions on passenger numbers in place. 

The CEOs of American, United, Southwest and Delta, as well as other major airlines, are expected to meet with Vice President Mike Pence on Friday in order to discuss travel issues related to the coronavirus, including whether the federal government should mandate temperature checks for passengers.

American's stock was down more than 5% in morning trading. 

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