Markets

Dow rallies more than 300 points on Friday as tech shares bounce, cutting losses for the week

The Fearless Girl statue is seen outside the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, New York, U.S., June 11, 2020.
Brendan McDermid | Reuters

U.S. stocks rose on Friday, recovering some of their losses for the week, as tech shares clawed back some of their big September declines. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 358.52 points higher, or 1.3%, at 27,173.96. The S&P 500 climbed 1.6% to 3,298.46. The Nasdaq Composite popped 2.26% to 10,913.56. It was the best day for the major averages since Sept. 9.

Shares of Amazon rose 2.5% and Facebook gained 2.1%. Apple advanced 3.8% and Microsoft climbed 2.3%. Netflix closed 2.1% higher. The S&P 500 tech sector jumped 2.4% and for its best day since Sept. 9, when it popped 3.4%.

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Cruise operators also contributed to Friday's gains. Carnival, Norwegian Cruise Line and Royal Caribbean were up 9.7%, 13.7% and 7.7%, respectively, after an upgrade from a Barclays analyst

The "sell-off has stabilized a bit over the last few days, but there are still no real signs of strength," said Mark Newton, managing member at Newton Advisors, in a note. "Thus, the trend remains bearish and not much to bet on a rebound."

Both the Dow and S&P 500 posted four-week losing streaks, their longest slides since August 2019, despite Friday's rally. The Dow lost 1.8% this week and the S&P 500 closed 0.6% lower week to date. The Nasdaq Composite had its first weekly gain in four weeks, rising 1.1% over that time period. 

That mixed weekly performance followed concerns around the state of the U.S. economic recovery as well as uncertainty around a new fiscal stimulus bill. 

House Democrats are preparing a $2.4 trillion relief package that they could vote on as soon as next week, a source familiar with the plans told CNBC. The bill would include enhanced unemployment benefits and aid to airlines, but the overall price tag remains well above what Republican leaders have said they are willing to spend. 

The major averages have had a tough month, with the S&P 500 falling 5.8% in September. The Dow has dropped 4.4% over that time period and the Nasdaq is down 7.3% month to date. 

Much of September's losses have been concentrated in megacap tech stocks, which carry a heavy weight in the indexes. Shares of Apple — the largest publicly traded company in the U.S. by market cap — have dropped 13% this month. Microsoft, Alphabet, Netflix, Amazon and Facebook are all down at least 7.9% over that time period. 

"After a buoyant and hopeful summer, financial markets are cooling in the face of reality," strategists at MRB Partners said in a note. "High-flying tech and tech-related stocks are in a full-blown correction, and weakness has recently spread to broader indexes, with a distinct smell of risk-off in the air. We had expected a gradual, albeit choppy, economic recovery, but it appears that some investors were not prepared for setbacks along the way."

Russ Koesterich, managing director and portfolio manager at BlackRock, said on CNBC's "Closing Bell" on Thursday that his team took profits in some high-flying tech stocks at the end of August and then were buying more cyclical stocks during the recent drop for the market. 

"What we've been trying to do in recent weeks is take the cyclical exposure up a little bit ... it's not that we think tech is going to roll over. We still like the themes. But on a shorter-term tactical basis, we're comfortable with the economy, we think we're going to continue to see improvement, and we're looking for names that are levered to that improvement," Koesterich said. 

—CNBC's Jacob Pramuk contributed to this story. 

CORRECTION: A previous headline for this report was updated to note that Dow futures were higher, rather than the Dow Jones Industrial Average itself.