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Massive eviction crisis looms as Covid protections expire this month: CNBC After Hours

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Massive eviction crisis looms as Covid protections expire this month: CNBC...

CNBC.com's MacKenzie Sigalos brings you the day's top business news headlines. On today's show, CNBC's Diana Olick looks ahead to the looming end of the CDC's eviction moratorium, and the potential crisis that could follow its expiration. Plus, Julianna Tatelbaum from CNBC Europe is on the ground in London as the very first person to be inoculated with a tested and reviewed Covid-19 vaccine gets her shot as the immunization effort begins in the UK.

A 90-year-old woman gets first Covid vaccine in UK, as massive rollout begins

The U.K. rolled out the first coronavirus vaccines to the public on Tuesday, making it the first country to inoculate people with a treatment that went through full testing.

Margaret Keenan, who turns 91 next week, made history as the world's first person to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine outside of trial conditions. The vaccine was approved by the U.K. drug regulator last week.

"I feel so privileged," she said. "It's the best early birthday present I could wish for because I can finally look forward to spending time with my family and friends in the New Year after being on my own for most of the year."

The CDC banned evictions. Tens of thousands have still occurred

Before the CDC issued its eviction moratorium, only a scattershot set of protections existed for struggling renters.

The $2 trillion stimulus package Congress passed in March included a prohibition on evictions from federally financed properties, including those backed by government-sponsored mortgage entities Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. However that policy covered just 1 in 4 rental units and expired in July.

McConnell backs off demand for liability protection in Covid stimulus negotiations

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday backed off his demand for businesses to get coronavirus-related liability protections as part of a year-end rescue package.

The Kentucky Republican urged Congress to pass an aid bill that contains neither legal immunity nor state and local government support, two roadblocks to lawmakers striking a relief deal.

"What I recommend is we set aside liability and set aside state and local, and pass those things that we can agree on knowing full well we'll be back at this after the 1st of the year" during the transition to President-elect Joe Biden's administration, McConnell told reporters on Tuesday.

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