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Europe Top News and Analysis Switzerland

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    The European Union's Commissioner for Competition dismissed criticism that moves to block the merger between NYSE Euronext and Deutsche Boerse were indicative of a Europe-wide problem of being too difficult on regulation.

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    Young people should work for free for up to two years to gain experience, youth and business leaders said at the World Economic Forum in Davos Thursday.

  • Societe Generale CEO Frederic Ouday said there are "some positive signs" that things are improving within the European Union, albeit slowly.

  • Mike Fries, President and CEO of Liberty Global

    Michael Fries, chief executive of cable operator Liberty Global sits down with CNBC to discuss its growth strategy.

  • Klaus Regling, chief executive officer of the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF)

    There is still “a lot of money” left in the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF), the fund set up to bail out struggling euro zone countries, Klaus Regling, chief executive of the fund, told CNBC Thursday.

  • Eric Schmidt

    The Internet is more resilient to the economic downturn than other industries, Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Google told CNBC in Davos on Thursday, and it will continue to create opportunities for “alarmingly interesting” things1st paragraph of story should go here

  • Egyptians pose for photos atop by an Egyptian army tank in Cairo, Egypt. Two days after the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian army is asserting its control and has dissolved the parliament and is suspending the constitution, meeting two key demands of pro-democracy protesters.

    The newly-elected Islamist governments in countries such as Egypt need to address urgent economic issues such as unemployment ahead of religious concerns, political leaders and religious experts said at the World Economic Forum Thursday.

  • facebook president Sean Parker

    It is “inevitable” that Facebook will go public and when it does it could be “the largest offering in history,” said Sean Parker, the first president of the social-networking site, in an interview with CNBC at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

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    It might sound heretical for a leader of a communications firm to suggest it, but lately I’ve been thinking that a lot of big brands and companies should take a vow of silence.

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    Investors underestimate just how positive an effect the ECB's move to flush the market with liquidity has had on banks, Huw van Steenis, head of EMEA banks and financials research at Morgan Stanley, said.

  • Jamie Dimon

    The impact of a Greek default on American banks would be negligible, JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon told CNBC on Thursday, and while there are chances of a bad outcome in Europe, he is not concerned about unpleasant surprises in the region.

  • Interest rates

    The Federal Reserve’s announcement on interest rates was welcomed by business leaders in Davos Thursday morning – but there is still nervousness about the future of the US economy.

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    Growth in Central and Eastern Europe hinges on developments in the euro zone and a slowdown in the CEE region is already underway, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) chief economist Erik Berglof told CNBC on Wednesday.

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    Austerity alone does not deliver the rewards it is meant to and the threats of stunted economic growth and recession remain high in the euro zone, Stephen King, global chief economist at HSBC told CNBC.

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    U.S. economic growth "is likely to be a little bit slower than we might have thought a couple of quarters back" because "the European situation is having an impact," Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit told CNBC.

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    German Chancellor Angela Merkel has rejected calls for a big increase in the eurozone's rescue fund.

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    Uncertainty and volatility will likely be the two words we will hear most during the first two days in Davos — uncertainty about economic growth rates, particularly in Europe, and volatility in commodity prices driven by continuing demand in emerging markets and possible political disruptions around the world.

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    Europe’s banking system is on the brink — and Wall Street is its bedfellow.  So what does Wall Street want out of Europe's most elite economic confab? Skiing, distressed debt deals, and above all: solvency.

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    More than 40 years since the World Economic Forum (WEF) began as the rather less-impressive sounding European Management Forum, political leaders, chief executives of the world’s biggest banks, royalty, actors and pop stars will converge on the small Swiss ski resort of Davos next week.

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    Hedge funds have been known to use hardball tactics to make money. Now they have come up with a new one: suing Greece in a human rights court to make good on its bond payments.