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US futures point to a higher open ahead of Apple event

A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017.
Michael Nagle | Bloomberg | Getty Images

U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open on Tuesday as Wall Street turns its sights to a key Apple event.

Dow Jones industrial average futures rose 57 points, while S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures gained 4 points and 14.5 points, respectively.

The tech giant Apple will host its latest consumer technology product event on Tuesday. Several announcements are set to take place on Tuesday by the smartphone maker, with Wall Street expecting a new Apple TV, three new iPhones and a new Apple Watch to be on the cards during the event.

Shares of Apple rose 0.75 percent in the premarket.

In the previous session, Wall Street ended on a high note as the damage from Hurricane Irma didn't appear to be as bad as feared. During trade, the Dow Jones industrial average rose sharply higher, closing up 259.58 points at 22,057.37. The positive sentiment provided a boost to markets in Asia and Europe during Tuesday's trade, with both regions edging higher on Tuesday.

Asian markets also advanced as tensions with North Korea dissipate. The United Nations Security Council stepped up pressure on the nation's textile exports and capped imports on crude oil.

On the data front, the U.S. Labor Department's latest Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) report is due out at 10 a.m. ET.

On the commodities front, oil prices fluctuated on Tuesday, even though concerns surrounding the economic impact of the likes of Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Harvey eased. At 8:24 a.m. ET, U.S. crude traded at $48.35 per barrel, while Brent was at $54.22.

After a turbulent weekend, Hurricane Irma was downgraded from a Category 5 hurricane to a post-tropical cyclone, according to the latest update by the U.S.' National Hurricane Center. On Tuesday, Irma is currently moving its way across the South East of the U.S.

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