Here's what it costs to live in the country's priciest towns

  • Based on home values and the cost of living, GOBankingRates determined the exact annual income needed to live comfortably in the country’s most expensive ZIP codes.
  • Sagaponack, a beachfront town in the affluent Hamptons area of Long Island, New York, is the nation’s priciest ZIP code, requiring an income of more than $850,000.
A multi-million dollar home is viewed in the wealthy town of Greenwich.
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A multi-million dollar home is viewed in the wealthy town of Greenwich.

Ever wonder what it would take to rub elbows with the upper crust in Greenwich, Connecticut or Beverly Hills?

Based on home values and the cost of living (including groceries, transportation, health-care costs and utilities), personal finance website GOBankingRates determined the exact annual income needed to live comfortably in the country’s most expensive ZIP codes.

The study assumes that half of that income will be spent on necessities, 20 percent put toward savings and 30 percent left for discretionary spending (otherwise known as the "50-30-20 rule").

In that case, Sagaponack, a beachfront town in the affluent Hamptons area of Long Island, New York, is the nation’s most expensive ZIP code, requiring an income of more than $850,000.

Here are the rest of the top 10 ZIP codes:

Not ready to move? To be counted among the 1 percent, regardless of where you live, you need to have an adjusted gross income of at least $480,930, according to the latest data from the Internal Revenue Service, which looked at income statistics for tax year 2015.

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