'We have a special relationship': British PM May says she trusts Trump

  • When asked whether she trusted President Trump, May said: "Well, yes. I mean, we work together. We have a special relationship."
  • She said Britain and America engage in "frank and open discussions," albeit they don't always see eye-to-eye.
  • May and Trump's relationship hit headlines in July after the president blasted her Brexit plan and praised former minister Boris Johnson.
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May at a press conference following their meeting at Chequers, the prime minister’s country residence, on July 13, 2018.
Brendan Smialowski | AFP | Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May at a press conference following their meeting at Chequers, the prime minister’s country residence, on July 13, 2018.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said Monday that she trusts President Donald Trump, citing the U.K. and U.S.' historic so-called "special relationship."

In an interview with CBS News, the U.K. leader said Britain and America engage in "frank and open discussions," albeit they don't always see eye-to-eye.

"When we disagree… we can say to each other we disagree and why we disagree," May told the broadcaster. "But at the same time, we cooperate on so much else, which is of crucial importance to us."

May cited security and defense as two key areas on which the countries cooperate. Britain and the U.S. have shared what is known as an unwritten "special relationship" on matters including joint military operations and intelligence sharing for decades.

When asked whether she trusted President Trump, May said: "Well, yes. I mean, we work together. We have a special relationship. This is two people reflecting as leaders of their two countries – the relationship that those two countries have and have built up over a number of years."

She said the Trump administration's decision to expel 60 Russian diplomats in March in response to the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury demonstrated the close security relationship shared between the two countries.

Washington has also implemented sanctions on Moscow over the Skripal attack, accusing Russia of breaching international rules on the use of lethal chemical and biological weapons.

May and Trump's relationship hit headlines in July after the president blasted her Brexit plan and claimed ousted minister Boris Johnson "would make a great prime minister" — a day before they were set to meet at Blenheim Palace.

In her interview with CBS on Monday, May pointed to Washington's decision to withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal as an area of disagreement between the two nations, adding that she believes Tehran is keeping up its end of the bargain.

"We do agree with the United States that there are other aspects of Iran's behavior that we need to be dealing with," May said.

"So looking at the issue of ballistic missiles. Looking at the way in which Iran is acting in the region to destabilize the region. We need to address those issues, too."

However, she added: "But we also want to ensure that we have a nuclear deal in place that prevents them from… getting a nuclear weapon."

You can read a transcript of CBS News' interview with Theresa May here.