Cramer Remix: Why I still have faith in Boeing

  • "I have total confidence in the Boeing company to get to the bottom of this and to restore any trust lost in the company," CNBC's Jim Cramer says.
  • "If that's enough, you should buy it," the "Mad Money" host says.
  • "Trying to reinvent your business has its risks, but standing still may be an even dicier proposition," he says.

Financial news have been "correctly" dominated by the Federal Aviation Administration's order that Boeing 737 Max jets be grounded in the United States after two of the planes were involved in fatal crashes in less than five months, CNBC's Jim Cramer said Wednesday.

The "Mad Money" host addressed questions he has been asked about how the event could affect the stock. Shares of the airplane manufacturer saw a 0.46 percent bump during the session, but he said it's "too soon" to assess the impact.

But Cramer isn't giving up on the company.

"I have total confidence in the Boeing company to get to the bottom of this and to restore any trust lost in the company," he said. "If that's enough, you should buy it."

Hear Cramer react to Boeing's woes here

Time for munchies

Kraft and Heinz products
Scott Olson | Getty Images
Kraft and Heinz products

Innovative companies have been some of the biggest winners when the stock market rises and it's a theme that established names should take note of, Cramer said.

All of the major markets made gains during the session—the Dow Jones Industrial Average added about 148 points, the S&P 500 increased 0.7 percent to top 2,800, the Nasdaq closed up 0.7 percent—powered by the tech and semiconductor sectors.

Facebook, Google-parent Alphabet, and Amazon with their targeted ads have disrupted traditional advertising and ad-supported media, which is getting behind subscription models and paywalls, Cramer said. Financial technology stocks like Visa, PayPal, and Square, among others, are changing the way people bank and manage their money, he added.

"Trying to reinvent your business has its risks, but standing still may be an even dicier proposition," the host said. "You either disrupt or you get disrupted—the companies that do nothing have the stocks that should be sold."

Click here to find out how Cramer suggests Kraft Heinz cleans out the fridge

Leaving the house for TJ Maxx

The reflection of shoppers are seen in a window at a TJ Maxx store in Peoria, Illinois.
Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty Images
The reflection of shoppers are seen in a window at a TJ Maxx store in Peoria, Illinois.

Amazon has been ripping through traditional retail, but TJ Maxx, Marshalls, and Home Goods' parent company TJX hasn't lost much of a beat, Cramer said.

The bears have been skeptical about the sustainability of the company's business model, but TJX is adding more brick-and-mortar locations and investing little online, he said. The stock plummeted after it delivered good quarterly results with shaky guidance last November, but it turned out that there was nothing to fear, he added.

Cramer thinks there's a chance that investors could pull the trigger and buy the stock.

Find out when to buy TJX here

Getting in the cloud

Dell CEO Michael Dell speaks during an interview with CNBC on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, July 2, 2018
Brendan McDermid | Reuters
Dell CEO Michael Dell speaks during an interview with CNBC on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, July 2, 2018

Dell Technologies is no longer just a PC company now that it is equipped to help companies adapt to the future of technology and focused on being inclusive of people that have been left out, CEO Michael Dell told CNBC Wednesday.

The information technology corporation, which began trading publicly again in late December after a nearly five-year hiatus, has adopted a new purpose since acquiring majority stakes in VMware, the former EMC Corporation, and Pivotal Software in recent years.

We "really have positioned ourselves as a company that can help our customers with the digital transformation: their journey to the cloud, and modernizing their IT environments, their workforce environment, and also IT security," he said in a sit-down interview with Cramer.

Get more on the conversation here

How far can Wells Fargo's rebound go?

Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan testifies before a House Financial Services Committee hearing titled: "Holding Megabanks Accountable: An Examination of Wells Fargo's Pattern of Consumer Abuses" in Washington, March 12, 2019.
Erin Scott | Reuters
Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan testifies before a House Financial Services Committee hearing titled: "Holding Megabanks Accountable: An Examination of Wells Fargo's Pattern of Consumer Abuses" in Washington, March 12, 2019.

Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan faced the House Financial Services Committee and its Chairwoman Maxine Waters on Tuesday. Cramer pointed out that members of the committee questioned the banker's integrity and sincerity as he defended the institution's clean up following the fake account scandal.

But the stock barley took a hit, the host said, and it's up more than 8 percent this year. Has the smoke cleared on Wells Fargo?

Listen to Cramer's thoughts here

Overcharge?

A man walks through light rain in front of the Hey Google booth under construction at the Las Vegas Convention Center in preparation for the 2018 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 8, 2018.
Steve Marcus | Reuters
A man walks through light rain in front of the Hey Google booth under construction at the Las Vegas Convention Center in preparation for the 2018 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 8, 2018.

Cramer loves Apple, Facebook, and Alphabet, but the host said he's a bit nervous about the stocks' multiple expansions. That's when investors pay more for the same amount of earnings, he explained.

Cramer thinks the stocks fell too low in the fourth quarter, but he said he winces about the recent action. Apple and Alphabet are up about 15 percent this year and Facebook is up more than 32 percent—but there hasn't been much major development in either of the companies.

Stocks shouldn't rally only on "hope," he said.

Get Cramer's full insight here

Cramer's lightning round: I'm not betting against this guy

In Cramer's lightning round, the "Mad Money" host gave callers his thoughts on their stock picks.

Aphria Inc.: "The guy who actually I think runs it day to day is Irwin Simon, our old friend from Hain Celestial, and I think that Irwin can pull something off here. I'm not betting against him. I don't want to."

NovaGold Resources Inc.: "You know, NovaGold—look it's just really, really speculative. It has not worked out for a lot of people. I say you gotta stick with [CEO Mark] Bristow and Barrick [Gold Corp]. That's what I want you to do."

Inspire Medical Systems Inc.: "Yeah, I actually know this company—neurostimulation. I think it's a good [speculation] 'cause neurostimulation is the future as we know because when we interviewed ... Medtronic [CEO] Omar Ishrak, he talked about it being terrific, that technology."

Disclosure: Cramer's charitable trust owns shares of Facebook, Alphabet, Amazon, and PayPal.

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