Health and Science

Texas and Florida report record average daily coronavirus deaths as hospitalizations also rise

Key Points
  • Both Texas and Florida posted a record in average daily new deaths six times in the previous seven days.
  • Texas had a seven-day average of 118.57 new deaths on Monday, which is nearly 39% higher compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.
  • Florida broke its record of average daily new deaths for two consecutive days.
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Texas and Florida hit a grim record Monday for daily coronavirus deaths based on a seven-day moving average, as hospitalizations continue to surge in 34 states across the United States. 

Both Texas and Florida posted a record in average daily new deaths six times in the previous seven days.

Texas had a seven-day average of 118.57 new deaths on Monday, which is nearly 39% higher compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The state also reported a record in average daily new cases with more than 10,572 cases per day over the past seven days as of Monday, up more than 15% compared with a week ago, according to CNBC's analysis. The state's average hospitalization number surged by more than 6% since last week after reporting a new high of 10,564 Covid-19 hospitalizations on Monday, according to CNBC's analysis of data from the Covid Tracking Project.

Texas officials and funeral home directors have ordered extra body bags and refrigerated trucks as they prepare for an increase in deaths from Covid-19. 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending 14 refrigerated trucks to the state this week, in addition to the eight already sent, to serve as temporary mortuaries. 

"The directors I've talked to in the last week are at capacity or overcapacity, thus the reason they had to bring in the trailers," said Gene Allen, president of the Texas Funeral Directors Association.

Last month, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott paused the state's reopening plan after reporting record increases in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations. After businesses started reopening in May, it has been experiencing a widespread infection of the virus and a significant spike in the number of confirmed cases. 

Abbott also issued an executive order in early July requiring residents in the state to wear a face covering in public spaces in counties with 20 or more positive coronavirus cases. 

"We have the ability to keep businesses open and move our economy forward so that Texans can continue to earn a paycheck, but it requires each of us to do our part to protect one another — and that means wearing a face covering in public spaces," he said in a press release.

Florida broke its record of average daily new deaths for two consecutive days. Its seven-day average of daily new deaths was 113.57 on Monday — an approximately 59% jump since last week, according to CNBC's analysis of Johns Hopkins data.

The state has been reporting record-breaking spikes in daily new cases over the past months since allowing businesses to reopen.

On Saturday, Florida reported 12,523 new Covid-19 cases, marking the fifth consecutive day the hot-spot state reported more than new 10,000 infections, according to the state's health department. 

Hospitalizations have also risen in recent weeks. As of Monday, hospitalizations increased to 9,489 Covid-19 patients across the state, according to the Covid Tracking Project. Since Florida started reporting its hospitalization data on July 10, the number of coronavirus patients increased by 36%.

"The residents here are terrified and I'm terrified, for the first time in my career because there's a lack of leadership," Democratic Rep. Donna Shalala, whose district is in Miami-Dade County, said Sunday on the ABC program "This Week." "It's terrible. We have community spread, which means the virus is out of control."

— CNBC's Will Feuer, Noah Higgins-Dunn and Berkeley Lovelace Jr. contributed to this report.