US Treasury yields rise after core CPI data tops 2% year over year

  • Following weeks of anticipation, President Trump and Kim Jong Un met in Singapore, which saw Kim sign an accord that "reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula."
  • Tuesday will mark the first day of the Fed's two-day meeting, where investors expect the U.S. central bank to announce a quarter-point increase in rates.

U.S. government debt prices rose on Tuesday after consumer price data showed that core CPI topped 2 percent on an annualized basis.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note was higher at around 2.966 percent at 11:49 a.m. ET, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond up at 3.102 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

Symbol
Yield
 
Change
%Change
US 3-MO
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US 1-YR
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US 2-YR
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US 5-YR
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US 10-YR
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US 30-YR
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Closely watched consumer pricing data, often viewed as an inflation barometer, rose 0.2 percent in May, matching expectations. In the 12 months through May, the CPI increased 2.8 percent, the biggest advance since February 2012, after rising 2.5 percent in April.

A slowdown in the climb of gasoline prices helped dampen the movement upward, though core CPI, which excludes volatile food and energy costs, also rose 0.2 percent. The year-over-year increase in core CPI is now 2.2 percent.

Investors also digested the latest news out of a historic meeting between the leaders of North Korea and the U.S. in Singapore.

Following weeks of anticipation, President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met in the city-state of Singapore, which saw Kim sign an accord that "reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula."

While the news appears reassuring, investors remain on edge as to what each country will see as "complete denuclearization." Following the meeting, Trump stated that the Korean conflict would end shortly, adding that both leaders learned a lot about one another.

With investors still cautious as to what the future of talks between North Korea and the West will look like, markets around the world fluctuated, with Europe trading flat while stocks in Asia closed mostly in the black.

The U.S. Treasury meantime will auction $14 billion in 30-year bonds.

Elsewhere, investors will be turning their attention to the start of a new monetary policy meeting by the U.S. Federal Reserve. Tuesday will mark the first day of June's two-day policy meeting, where investors expect the U.S. central bank to announce a quarter-point increase in interest rates.

Following this event, which is expected to draw to a close on Wednesday afternoon, the European Central Bank will host its next monetary policy meeting on Thursday.

—CNBC's Nyshka Chandran and Everett Rosenfeld contributed to this report.