Politics

President Trump is tweeting more than ever as the impeachment probe heats up

Key Points
  • As a House impeachment inquiry gains momentum, President Donald Trump's Twitter activity surges to new heights.
  • Trump has sent more tweets over the past week than in any other seven-day period since his inauguration, according to a CNBC analysis of his feed.
  • Since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the inquiry, Trump has sent more than 250 tweets, or an average of nearly 40 a day. The majority of these are related to the impeachment inquiry.

President Donald Trump's Twitter activity has surged to new heights as an impeachment probe heats up in the House.

The president often turns to the social media platform as a way to drum up support among his followers. This impeachment-themed tweetstorm, however, is his strongest to date. Trump has sent more tweets over the past week than in any other seven-day period since his inauguration, according to a CNBC analysis of his feed.

The House of Representatives began an impeachment inquiry last week after a whistleblower report raised concerns about a phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Following House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's formal announcement about the inquiry on Sept. 24, the volume of Trump's tweets rapidly escalated.

Trump has sent more than 250 tweets over that time span, an average of nearly 40 a day. The majority of these have been related to the impeachment inquiry.

While Trump's tweet warning of a "Civil War like fracture" made headlines, his promotion of various anti-impeachment voices was a larger pattern throughout the week. On Sunday morning, he sent more than 20 tweets and retweets about conservative personality Mark Levin's appearance on "Fox & Friends."

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, made for a frequent target throughout the week.

In one tweet targeting Schiff, Trump wondered whether the congressman should be arrested for treason.

VIDEO4:3804:38
Impeachment bid could affect public opinion next year, strategist says