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Coronavirus: Qatar Airways CEO warns of more bailouts, collapses in airline industry

The coverage on this live blog has ended — but for up-to-the-minute coverage on the coronavirus, visit the live blog from CNBC's U.S. team.

Negotiations on Capitol Hill over a stimulus deal remain deadlocked despite optimism earlier in the day. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said there won't be aid for airlines without a broader package, quashing hopes of a stand-alone bill that could garner bipartisan support. However, Pelosi and the White House have apparently renewed talks on a broader package. American Airlines CEO, meanwhile, is warning of additional service cuts if aid does not come through soon. The airlines started furloughing more than 30,000 workers last week.

Here are some of the biggest developments Thursday:

The following data was compiled by Johns Hopkins University:

  • Global cases: More than 36.5 million 
  • Global deaths: At least 1.06 million
  • U.S. cases: More than 7.6 million
  • U.S. deaths: At least 212,700

UK economic growth unexpectedly slows to 2.1% in August

A waitress wearing a protective face covering brings drinks to customers in the late summer sunshine at outside tables in Soho, central London on September 20, 2020.
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS | AFP | Getty Images

The U.K. economy expanded at a monthly rate of 2.1% in August, according to the Office for National Statistics, as the country's economic recovery from the pandemic continued, albeit at a slower pace than expected.

The latest data showed the country's gross domestic product (GDP), which measures the extent of economic activity, was still 9.2% lower than in February, before the full economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak was felt.

Economists polled by Reuters had anticipated the U.K. to record a monthly expansion of 4.6% in August. — Sam Meredith

Negative views about China soared to record highs globally, Pew survey finds

Negative views of China reached their "highest points" in most countries polled by Pew Research Center in a recent survey.

That sentiment surged the most in Australia, where 81% of respondents said they viewed China unfavorably — a rise of 24 percentage points from last year. In the survey, a majority — a median of 61% across the 14 countries — say that China has done a bad job in handling the coronavirus pandemic.

Confidence in Chinese President Xi Jinping was also shaken as a result, although more still have faith in Xi than U.S. President Donald Trump, the poll found. Trump has also been heavily criticized for his handling of the Covid-19 crisis in the U.S. — Weizhen Tan

Qatar Airways CEO: The 'worst is not behind' for airlines

Months into the coronavirus pandemic, the outlook for the airline industry continues to be frail.

"The worst is not behind any airline, not only Qatar Airways," the Gulf carrier's CEO Akbar Al Baker told CNBC's Dan Murphy. 

"There will soon be other bailouts in Europe, there will be other collapses around the world. Because of the second wave, I think it is ... even more severe than in the first wave," he said.

More than 40 airlines have already collapsed so far this year as air travel took an unprecedented hit, with the pandemic bringing the industry to a near standstill. — Natasha Turak, Eustance Huang

Pelosi and Mnuchin talk stimulus amid mixed messages

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin spoke for 40 minutes by phone this afternoon about "whether there is any prospect of an imminent agreement on a comprehensive bill," according to Pelosi spokesman Drew Hammill.

Hammill said Mnuchin "made clear" Trump was interested in a comprehensive relief package. The White House has sent mixed messages on where it stands. Earlier in the week, Trump called off negotiations until after the election, but subsequently backtracked and pushed for smaller stand-alone bills addressing specific issues. 

Talks on a broader package now appear to be back on. —Spencer Kimball


FDA approves GenMark test that screens for flu and coronavirus

California-based lab test manufacturer GenMark Diagnostics announced Thursday that the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for its rapid molecular test that can distinguish between more than 20 different viruses and bacteria, including the coronavirus.

Flu and Covid-19 patients typically develop similar symptoms early on in the virus, which could make it difficult this flu season for doctors and nurses to diagnose patients and pursue the best treatment. Tests like GenMark's that are able to simultaneously screen for the flu, the coronavirus and other pathogens could be crucial to helping hospitals effectively treat Covid-19 and influenza patients this winter, public health specialists say.

Shares of Genmark shot up about 15% in after hours trading before paring gains and was trading up more than 3% after the close. —Will Feuer

Feds thwart plot to kidnap Michigan governor

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks during the opening night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention on Aug. 17th, 2020.

Federal law enforcement has charged six men for an alleged plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and take her to Wisconsin where they planned to try her for "treason." 

Whitmer, a Democrat, has been the target of anti-government groups for implementing emergency social distancing measures to stop the spread of coronavirus.  

The men also allegedly discussed attacking the Michigan state Capitol and using Molotov cocktails to destroy police cars, according to court documents.  

Several of the defendants were arrested as they allegedly met to pool money to buy explosives. One of the men said he bought an 800,000 volt taser to use in the plot. 

Seven other men have been arrested on state charges related to the federal investigation into the kidnapping plot. —Spencer Kimball

American Airlines CEO says more services cuts likely without stimulus

American Airlines CEO: There is enormous bipartisan support for extension of payroll support program
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American Airlines CEO: There is enormous bipartisan support for extension of payroll support program

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker told CNBC the company is likely to cut service to more U.S. cities without additional coronavirus relief from Congress. 

"We can't continue to wait. If forced to, of course, we will indeed discontinue service to a lot of markets and we will be much slower to rebound and help the country rebound from this pandemic," Parker said on "Squawk Alley." 

Parker said American has already slashed service in about 13 markets through November, but the coronavirus-related decline in travel demand makes it difficult to keep flying there. "There will absolutely be discontinuation of service to small communities, and there will be much less service to larger communities" without more coronavirus relief, he stressed. - Kevin Stankiewicz 

Dr. Fauci ‘not comfortable’ with level of U.S. cases

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, said he's "not comfortable" with the level of new U.S. Covid-19 cases as the nation enters its cooler seasons.

The U.S. is reporting around 40,000 new Covid-19 cases per day but needs to get the number down to at least 10,000, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases told MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell. 

Covid-19 cases are growing by 5% or more, based on a weekly average to smooth out daily reporting, in 31 states as well as the District of Columbia as of Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Health officials have repeatedly warned that they are preparing to battle two bad viruses circulating later this year as the Covid-19 outbreak runs into flu season.  —Berkeley Lovelace Jr.

Consumers' 'saving