Archive Europe Markets

  • European stocks ended firmly lower Wednesday as the outlook for banks remained gloomy in the wake of writedowns from Alliance & Leicester and BNP Paribas.

  • European stocks closed slightly higher Tuesday, but off their earlier levels after a rally in banking stocks lost momentum in the run-up to the market close.

  • European markets were firmly in positive territory Monday, as banking stocks gained following news Northern Rock was to be nationalized. Oil-related firms also jumped as crude prices neared one-month highs.

  • European stocks closed sharply lower Friday, with banks suffering the worst of the selling as investors braced for further writedowns from the sector.

  • European stock markets closed largely flat Thursday after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said the Fed was prepared to act to help the struggling U.S. economy.

  • European stocks ended mixed Wednesday, despite surprisingly good news from the U.S. retail sector, which pulled the major indexes higher in the afternoon session.

  • European stocks closed sharply higher Tuesday, after U.S. billionaire investor Warren Buffett inspired a late rally by offering to take on $800 billion worth of debt insured by top bond insurers.

  • European stocks ended lower across the board Monday, with banking and insurance stocks suffering the worst of the selling. Warnings of further financial turmoil from G7 finance ministers at the weekend contributed to the session’s bearish sentiment.

  • European stocks ended the week mixed Friday, having struggled to find direction throughout the session. The major European indexes marked a loss for the week’s trading as the specter of a recession in the U.S. continued to sap investor sentiment. 

  • European stocks fell sharply lower Thursday to close at their lowest level in two weeks after the European Central Bank held interest rates at 4.0 percent and the Bank of England cut by another quarter point to 5.25 percent.

  • European shares managed to end a volatile session in positive territory Wednesday, having followed U.S. stocks higher and gained from bullish utilities and telecom stocks.

  • European stocks closed sharply lower Tuesday after a report showed a contraction in the U.S. services sector in January, increasing fears of a recession in the world's biggest economy.

  • Europe's major stock indexes ended mixed Monday, despite trading higher throughout the morning session, following a weaker-than-expected rise in U.S. factory orders in December. The data pulled U.S. stocks lower at the open and took the shine of a recent boom in merger and acquisition activity.

  • European stocks ended firmly higher across the board Friday, despite weaker-than-expected U.S. economic data, as China and U.S. aluminum producer Alcoa teamed up to buy a $14 billion stake in Rio Tinto.

  • European shares rallied in late trading on Thursday to close largely flat as gains for mobile phone maker Nokia and chemicals maker BASF offset losses for financials, notably UBS.

  • European stocks closed lower across the board Wednesday as bigger-than-expected writedowns from UBS added to the general gloom surrounding the banking sector and did nothing to calm investors’ jitters ahead of an expected interest rate cut in U.S.

  • Europe's major stock indexes closed higher across the board Tuesday, buoyed by hopes that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates again on Wednesday in order to avoid the world’s largest economy going into a recession.

  • European stocks ended mostly in the red Monday, but off earlier lows caused by a surprise 4.7 percent drop in US new home sales, which left the bears firmly in control ahead of the Federal Reserve's interest-rate meeting Wednesday.

  • Investors breathed a sigh of relief as the end of a highly volatile week in European stock markets left the benchmark indexes largely unchanged from their starting positions.

  • European stocks soared Thursday, making a comeback from recent lows and shrugging off news of fraud that caused French bank Societe Generale billions of euros in losses.