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Budget Blinds

WYOMING

Tev and Annie Kelley of Budget Blinds in Cody, Wyoming. Tev was working as an installer for the franchise in 2007 when he realized he'd rather be an owner.
Source: Erica Nielson
Tev and Annie Kelley of Budget Blinds in Cody, Wyoming. Tev was working as an installer for the franchise in 2007 when he realized he'd rather be an owner.
Description: Custom window coverings
Owner: Tev Kelley
Years in business: 8
No. of franchises owned: 1
Start-up costs: $86,950 to $94,950; $39,500 cash
Franchisor fees: $19,500; royalties $1,500 per month
2015 revenue, 2016 projection: $425,000; $500,000
2016 projected annual growth rate: 17%

In 2007, Tev Kelley was working as an installer for Budget Blinds, the home-based custom window-coverings franchise, when he quickly realized that he'd rather be an owner. At the time, he was living in Sheridan, Wyoming, but saw the chance to move back to his hometown of Cody, Wyoming, as a franchise owner.

"I liked that I didn't have to 'sell' anything," Kelley said. "I just had to go in, listen to the customer and then give them what they wanted. The sample books are amazing, and the product just sells itself."

Additional franchisee resources

Kelley purchased his franchise in 2008 and was able to grow his business quickly since Budget Blinds supports the brand with robust national advertising that includes both print and television. "When people move to Cody and need blinds, they choose Budget Blinds because they see it as a national brand with a good reputation," he said.

The parent company is always available for support and guidance, especially when a customer request is unique. For example, when a local movie theater wanted new, motorized drapes for its 40-foot by 100-foot screen, Kelley was able to speak with the franchisor to figure out the best way to meet this customer request.

Kelley's territory covers most of the western half of Wyoming, so he has two subcontractors that help him service customers. "I could operate the day-to-day and probably make a bigger income for myself than paying my subcontractors to do it," he said. "But I make enough to pay the bills and spend the rest of the time with my wife and two-year-old son hiking in the mountains."

"I could operate the day-to-day and probably make a bigger income ... but I make enough to pay the bills and spend the rest of the time with my wife and two-year-old son hiking in the mountains." -Tev Kelley

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